User:Visviva/Reader 19881014

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-10-14 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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37246 tokens ‧ 28553 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5634 types ‧ 51 (~ 0.905%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-10-14[edit]

  1. achronological
    • 1988 October 14, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Muddled Americans”, Chicago Reader:
      Another reason was the apparently inspired pairing of screenwriter Dennis Potter and director Nicolas Roeg, two dark poets of psychic subtexts and achronological memory flashes.
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  2. antilittering
    • 1988 October 14, Grant Pick, “This Could Be Your Last 5 Mintes Alive!”, Chicago Reader:
      The group was hauled to Police Headquarters at 11th and State, and Lyons was charged, as best he recalls it, under an antilittering statute and another banning advertising on Park District property.
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  3. antirock
  4. balkanization
  5. concertizing
    • 1988 October 14, Dennis Polkow, “Serkin and Solti”, Chicago Reader:
      Of the great romantic pianists, Vladimir Horowitz and Serkin are the only ones still actively concertizing.
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  6. conventioneer
    • 1988 October 14, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      "Presumably a conventioneer who arrives by taxi from the airport, stays in the McCormick Hotel, and attends expositions in the McCormick complex would experience a Chicago that none of us who walk through the Loop could imagine.
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  7. corpselike
    • 1988 October 14, Lawrence Bommer, “Independence”, Chicago Reader:
      Making too much out of a reference to Kess's corpselike appearance as a child, Vita Dennis makes her awfully humorless and dour.
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  8. counterattacked
  9. curbside
  10. developpes
    • 1988 October 14, Laura Molzahn, “Beautiful Animals”, Chicago Reader:
      Duncan's women's moves are typically adagio, lyrical; women reach for the skies in slow, utterly stretched developpes and arabesques.
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  11. disembowelings
    • 1988 October 14, Holly Greenhagen, “Theater Notes: 80 gallons of blood a month”, Chicago Reader:
      The action revolves around a party, thrown by a new kid in town, where one by one the guests are killed off by various grisly means: throat-slittings, multiple stabbings, even disembowelings.
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  12. dithery
    • 1988 October 14, Albert Williams, “Romeo and Juliet”, Chicago Reader:
      Steve Pickering is forceful as Mercutio, played here as a crippled and embittered war veteran; Mike Nussbaum is a gentle, slightly dithery Friar Lawrence, and John Reeger an appropriately powerful Prince of Verona (here a pin-striped don wielding authority over an immigrant enclave).
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  13. doghair
    • 1988 October 14, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      In the absence of fire, lodgepole pine may be replaced by the dense, stunted stands of spruce and fir that foresters call doghair stands.
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  14. drenchingly
    • 1988 October 14, Bill Wyman, “Fire and Water”, Chicago Reader:
      Now it was raining seriously, almost drenchingly, Maxwell Street was closing down, but the fire continued to burn arrogantly in the downpour.
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  15. ensembling
    • 1988 October 14, Dennis Polkow, “Serkin and Solti”, Chicago Reader:
      The third and fourth movements were marred by some sloppy string ensembling, especially during downward runs and glissandi, which I attribute to overbeating by Solti.
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  16. funksters
    • 1988 October 14, Franklin Soults, “Sly & Robbie”, Chicago Reader:
      Each side of the disc takes a near-standard black pop tune--"Fire" on one side, "Yes We Can" on the other--and then uses it as the takeoff point for three interconnected tunes that act as three movements in a symphony, a symphony carried by an orchestra of jazzmen, rappers, veteran funksters, reggae toasters, and avant-garde samplers.
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  17. heartbrokenly
  18. highpitched
    • 1988 October 14, Laura Molzahn, “Beautiful Animals”, Chicago Reader:
      Two solos take an affectionate look at how men move--in the first, Suarez dances with a ready lilt and give, and in the second, Mullaney dances with a brittle explosiveness that goes perfectly with the highpitched, glassy music that accompanies it.
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  19. hyperextended
    • 1988 October 14, Neil Tesser, “Maarten Altena Octet”, Chicago Reader:
      Altena, a Dutch bassist whose prodigious technique is matched only by his iconoclasm, has jumbled together source music ranging from Mozart minuets to tangos to the film scores of Nino Rota to the hyperextended forays of Albert Ayler, and the results are anything but smooth: the octet bounces from style to style, breaking off (for example) in the midst of early-40s classicism to feature a screaming sax solo over rock-'n'-roll drums, and then returning to a delicate clarinet filigree.
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  20. hypermacho
    • 1988 October 14, Achy Obejas, “The Collage Project”, Chicago Reader:
      John Brown plays a disturbing A. C. , a hypermacho restaurateur who wraps his cocaine in shots of vaginas cut out from Hustler magazine.
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  21. lodgepole
    • 1988 October 14, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      Old-growth lodgepole pine woods are deserts from a deer's point of view.
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  22. mitzvahs
    • 1988 October 14, Danila Oder, “Heaven on Earth”, Chicago Reader:
      That is because there is not enough time in one lifetime to do all the mitzvahs, so God puts us back on earth to give us another chance.
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  23. monotonal
    • 1988 October 14, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Muddled Americans”, Chicago Reader:
      Roeg has pointed out that Track 29 places more emphasis on acting than his previous features, and because of their monotonal performances, Russell, Lloyd, and Bernhard all seem to suffer as a consequence.
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  24. multiinstrumentalist
  25. nonclassics
    • 1988 October 14, Holly Greenhagen, “Theater Notes: 80 gallons of blood a month”, Chicago Reader:
      He's seen critical classics (including the work of David Cronenberg and George Romero), popular classics (Friday the 13th, Halloween), and nonclassics (Happy Birthday to Me, My Bloody Valentine).
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  26. nonsubscription
    • 1988 October 14, Dennis Polkow, “Serkin and Solti”, Chicago Reader:
      Yet two of the figures who opened the Chicago Symphony's 98th season in a special nonsubscription fund-raiser on September 28 are legendary.
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  27. operagoers
    • 1988 October 14, Dennis Polkow, “La Triviata”, Chicago Reader:
      What is especially disappointing about all of this is the effect it has on first-time operagoers, some of whom I heard chatting behind me on opening night.
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  28. overbeating
    • 1988 October 14, Dennis Polkow, “Serkin and Solti”, Chicago Reader:
      The third and fourth movements were marred by some sloppy string ensembling, especially during downward runs and glissandi, which I attribute to overbeating by Solti.
      add
  29. phoenixlike
    • 1988 October 14, David Whiteis, “Maxwell Street Blues”, Chicago Reader:
      But every Sunday morning, the energy of the Maxwell Street market area rises phoenixlike from the rubble.
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  30. pianistics
    • 1988 October 14, Renaldo Migaldi, “Sergei Kuryokhin”, Chicago Reader:
      After first discovering his brilliantly hip twisty-fingered pianistics on recordings Kuryokhin made as a member of Boris Grebenschikov's rock band Aquarium (recordings that had to be smuggled out of the USSR by Westerners), I then moved on to his fascinating solo stuff, in which heartrending lyricism alternates with a convoluted percussive hammering sound reminiscent of Cecil Taylor.
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  31. platanos
    • 1988 October 14, Bill Wyman, “Fire and Water”, Chicago Reader:
      My first visit was a soggy mess; droplets muddied the road and fell, not very faintly, over the living and the dead and the hubcaps and the bootleg Head & Shoulders and the platanos and the sneakers.
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  32. presentence
    • 1988 October 14, Michael Miner, “Local Paper Does Good; Quayle Watching”, Chicago Reader:
      "Pulitzer's request"--Marshall would eventually write--"is both novel and complex, pitting the public's right to know about the criminal justice system against the traditional confidentiality of presentence investigation materials.
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  33. presentencing
    • 1988 October 14, Michael Miner, “Local Paper Does Good; Quayle Watching”, Chicago Reader:
      He discovered that the New York Times and Washington Post had both tried to get their hands on presentencing materials.
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  34. reactionaryism
    • 1988 October 14, Achy Obejas, “The Collage Project”, Chicago Reader:
      But the zenith of reactionaryism is reached when the boy, after learning of the girl's abortion, screams out, "You killed our baby!
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  35. semishared
    • 1988 October 14, Dan Liberty, “Club Dates: the eclectic boogie of Souled American”, Chicago Reader:
      " Some of Barnard's not-so-famous characters, like Dr. Brad, a legendary beer-drinking doctor buddy of the band's, are offered as a semishared private joke.
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  36. sinfonietta
    • 1988 October 14, Ted Shen, “Chicago Sinfonietta”, Chicago Reader:
      One essential difference in the sinfonietta, however, is the number of ethnic and third-world composers it is giving their first local hearing.
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  37. sleekish
  38. synopsize
    • 1988 October 14, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Muddled Americans”, Chicago Reader:
      The other half, which is intercut with Henry's activities, follows Linda over the same period, but it is impossible to synopsize objectively because its progress depends on another character, Martin (Gary Oldman), a young Englishman whose status as real or imaginary is never fully established.
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  39. ultrapop
    • 1988 October 14, Bill Wyman, “Fear of rocking: Camper Van Beethiven and the limits of absurdism”, Chicago Reader:
      "Life Is Grand," for example, the album's closer, starts with a vibrant, bouncy, ultrapop guitar line; it sounds like the beginning of an old Monkees song, or the Turtles doing "You Baby" or "She'd Rather Be With Me.
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  40. unawakened
  41. waddings
  42. waterpower
    • 1988 October 14, Bill Wyman, “Fire and Water”, Chicago Reader:
      Fire trucks were parked everywhere: a new arrival was being carefully backed around the stacked pallets to add some new waterpower.
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Sequestered[edit]