User:Visviva/Reader 19881021

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-10-21 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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40321 tokens ‧ 30911 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5443 types ‧ 34 (~ 0.625%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-10-21[edit]

  1. bloodberry
    • 1988 October 21, Adam Langer, “Dept. of Collections: no special attachment to gumball machines”, Chicago Reader:
      Here, on the first floor, are glass bowls filled with antique gumballs, an antique tin of Beech-Nut chewing gum, Wrigley's gum matchbooks, and old packages of gum with flavors ranging from "tangy barbecue" to "bloodberry" to "Medinah black horse troop gum.
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  2. clonelike
    • 1988 October 21, Albert Williams, “Follies; 1000 Airplanes on the Roof”, Chicago Reader:
      As in the film Invasion of the Body Snatchers, with its spiritually dead, clonelike "pod people," M. 's reaction to his real or imagined encounter with extraterrestrials comes to symbolize the dehumanization and de-emotionalization of contemporary life--the willful denial of connection to other humans and the avoidance of introspection.
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  3. codirectors
    • 1988 October 21, Albert Williams, “Follies; 1000 Airplanes on the Roof”, Chicago Reader:
      Combining the songwriting genius of Stephen Sondheim with the staging innovations of codirectors Harold Prince (Sondheim's collaborator on the earlier Company) and Michael Bennett (who, of course, went on to create Chorus Line), the ground-breaking Follies was recognized as an artistic landmark from the moment of its 1971 premiere.
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  4. coscripted
    • 1988 October 21, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Things Change”, Chicago Reader:
      David Mamet's second feature as a director, coscripted with Shel Silverstein, is a little bit of a letdown after House of Games, but as a Mafia fairy tale with a tour de force performance by Don Ameche (soft-pedaling all the way), it is certainly watchable and enjoyable enough in its own right.
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  5. dipsomaniacal
    • 1988 October 21, Lawrence Bommer, “Magnum Farce”, Chicago Reader:
      All of them mug as if they had invented it, but my favorite send-up is Jerry Bloom's cunning Selsdon Mowbray, the dipsomaniacal, doddering Shakespearean hack now reduced to playing an ancient burglar.
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  6. downcoast
    • 1988 October 21, Kathie Newhouse, “Deep Appreciation”, Chicago Reader:
      Trapping of littoral drift sediment, preventing it from reaching downcoast beaches.
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  7. egotripping
    • 1988 October 21, Lawrence Bommer, “Magnum Farce”, Chicago Reader:
      Now the play's an actors' nightmare as the disgruntled cast, mired in alcohol, jealousies, and rampant egotripping, fiendishly enact an unintentional farce within a farce, a complex mime show superimposed on the play itself.
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  8. erosiveness
    • 1988 October 21, Kathie Newhouse, “Deep Appreciation”, Chicago Reader:
      Wave diffraction and refraction, altering and accelerating currents and increasing wave energy, increasing their erosiveness on the site itself and on flanking sites.
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  9. festivalgoer
    • 1988 October 21, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Cinema Sprawl”, Chicago Reader:
      No two of our reviewers (19 so far) operate according to the same tastes or standards, so the selective festivalgoer should proceed with caution and discernment.
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  10. goin
  11. hamminess
    • 1988 October 21, Lawrence Bommer, “Magnum Farce”, Chicago Reader:
      The actors carry off this farce with the usual crude camp, semaphore gestures, shameless hamminess, and heavy ogling.
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  12. heldentenor
    • 1988 October 21, George Grass, “WagnerVision”, Chicago Reader:
      The absence of the Lyric's usual work-horse heldentenor William Johns (who, according to Lyric, dropped out of the show--quite uncharacteristically--due to illness) was sadly evident here.
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  13. jungled
  14. multideity
    • 1988 October 21, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      In their sculpture the Yoruba celebrate their multideity universe; through their dress they signal social status, cult membership, and political rank.
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  15. neighborhoodbased
  16. nonactor
  17. operagoer
    • 1988 October 21, George Grass, “WagnerVision”, Chicago Reader:
      These last were shown in different colors from the others in an attempt to assist the perplexed operagoer.
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  18. overreliance
    • 1988 October 21, Lawrence Bommer, “Magnum Farce”, Chicago Reader:
      Despite the naughty puns, leaden exposition, telegraphed laughs, and overreliance on prop-heavy plots--much of the action here is intricately connected to a plate of sardines that seems to wander everywhere--this is a type of comedy that works.
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  19. poetics
    • 1988 October 21, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Bird Watching”, Chicago Reader:
      Both significantly build on the poetics of death and dissolution that Black and Tan broached so powerfully, and both help to rectify a form of sociological and artistic neglect that remains one of this country's biggest scandals.
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  20. postadmission
    • 1988 October 21, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Congress evidently saw the wisdom of this and dealt with the matter in the Hawaii Omnibus Act of 1960, which took care of various postadmission loose ends.
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  21. postconstruction
    • 1988 October 21, Paul A. Kakuris, “We Cover the Lakefront”, Chicago Reader:
      When all available relevant data is in, the team will assess any likely erosion threats, suggest any indicated design changes to mitigate possible negative impacts or to enhance the shoreline, and recommend postconstruction monitoring procedures for any possible future mitigation.
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  22. shatterer
    • 1988 October 21, Anthony Adler, “Einstein: A Stage Portrait”, Chicago Reader:
      It's reassuring to think of the world shatterer at home, all cozy with his sweatshirt and a cup of tea.
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  23. sheerly
    • 1988 October 21, George Grass, “WagnerVision”, Chicago Reader:
      On a sheerly technical plane, the projections used for the backgrounds were very effective, particularly in the third act, where a sunset faded most convincingly.
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  24. stagings
    • 1988 October 21, George Grass, “WagnerVision”, Chicago Reader:
      Deprived of his favorite technique of standing traditional stagings on their heads by putting them in a contemporary setting, Sellars could think up nothing to amaze or shock.
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  25. subprovince
  26. tonette
    • 1988 October 21, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Bird Watching”, Chicago Reader:
      During the credits, we get a three-step history of Parker's musical progress--from a Kansas City tot with a tonette riding a pony in his backyard to a teenager traversing his porch while practicing on his alto sax to a full-blown jazzman at the height of his powers in a 52nd Street club, playing "Lester Leaps In. " The final transition is almost as dynamic and exciting as the bone-to-spacecraft cut in Kubrick's 2001.
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  27. torchy
    • 1988 October 21, Albert Williams, “Follies; 1000 Airplanes on the Roof”, Chicago Reader:
      The theatrics of musical comedy become a metaphor for psychological disorientation, with each person getting a song to dramatize his or her crisis: the lovelorn Sally sings a torchy blues (the poignant "Losing My Mind"), hypocritical Ben masquerades as a carefree song-and-dance man in the bubbly, Gershwin-esque "Live, Laugh, Love," and so on.
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  28. veddy
    • 1988 October 21, Lawrence Bommer, “Magnum Farce”, Chicago Reader:
      In Noises Off we're hurled through the first act--in three different incarnations--from an imaginary very silly, veddy British sex farce, Nothing On, that's deservedly playing the provinces.
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  29. willya
  30. wonderstruck
    • 1988 October 21, Albert Williams, “Follies; 1000 Airplanes on the Roof”, Chicago Reader:
      M. , speaking in a tone at once determinedly rational and confused, wonderstruck and terrified, haltingly informs us that he has been repeatedly abducted by extraterrestrial beings, transported to a spaceship hovering above the earth, and subjected to painful and bizarre experiments that include a tiny silver globe being inserted up his nose and into his brain.
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Sequestered[edit]