User:Visviva/Reader 19881104

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-11-04 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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37652 tokens ‧ 29395 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5470 types ‧ 53 (~ 0.969%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-11-04[edit]

  1. antimagic
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      Weimer opened the show with an "antimagic" act, an idea that goes back half a century but that he pulled off with vigor.
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  2. antimilitary
    • 1988 November 4, Peter Friederici, “Significant Moments”, Chicago Reader:
      The only armed men Gross shows us in action are arresting demonstrators at European antimilitary protests.
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  3. apoetical
    • 1988 November 4, Anthony Adler, “Hitting the Skids”, Chicago Reader:
      A master of simple, solid, apoetical, reportorial English.
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  4. commalike
    • 1988 November 4, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      The traditional explanation for the commalike paisley motif is that it's a pine cone, but if so it's the damnedest pine cone I ever saw.
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  5. conventioneer
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      ' [Burger adopts the mien of a jittery, hungover conventioneer] 'What the fuck?
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  6. discarder
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      Burger, though, is a discarder rather than a collector; what items there are have a personal or aesthetic appeal: a few bits of stone that look like a miniature segment of Stonehenge; a pack of Max Maven playing cards, named after a famous "mentalist," a good friend of Burger's; a couple of trick devices, including one shaped like a skull; and a few lavishly weird "bizarre majick" books, these the work of Tony Andruzzi, a local magician.
      add
  7. doomy
    • 1988 November 4, Franklin Soults, “Sonic Youth”, Chicago Reader:
      Their big hit at the time was "Death Valley '69," a typical droney, doomy replay of the Manson murders that was about as illuminating as your average TV mini series.
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  8. droney
    • 1988 November 4, Franklin Soults, “Sonic Youth”, Chicago Reader:
      Their big hit at the time was "Death Valley '69," a typical droney, doomy replay of the Manson murders that was about as illuminating as your average TV mini series.
      add
  9. drumbeating
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      What sets Burger's books apart is his insistent drumbeating for his own particular brand of magic making, an uncompromising amalgam of New Age theorizing, hard-boiled advice on such important things as tipping and dealing with hecklers, rigorous self-analysis, hard-line recommendations on practice and rehearsal, and citations from everyone from Marshall Field to Saint Thomas Aquinas, Aldous Huxley's wife to Bonaventure, the German theologian Rudolf Bultmann to an anonymous Sufi priest.
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  10. evenhandedness
    • 1988 November 4, Lawrence Bommer, “Edith and Anton”, Chicago Reader:
      But Richard's adaptation gives Evelina an almost equal emphasis; that evenhandedness makes Evelina appear more real than she would have seemed to Anson.
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  11. everykid
    • 1988 November 4, Peter Friederici, “Significant Moments”, Chicago Reader:
      These photos and interviews are of everykid, a suffering, struggling, and surviving being who could be living anywhere; Kids should see this exhibit so they realize they're not alone.
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  12. farebox
    • 1988 November 4, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      From a summary of the proposed 1989 budget for Pace, the suburban bus agency: "A General Strategy requiring services and capital programs pursued by Pace should not lower the Pace farebox recovery ratio if intended to increase ridership, and should not reduce ridership if intended to increase the farebox recovery ratio.
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  13. globby
    • 1988 November 4, Adam Langer, “Chi Lives: La Tour's master amid mayhem”, Chicago Reader:
      What they'd do was take all the scraps of the prime rib from the day before, and they'd take beef base and water and make a roux, and make this globby soup with scraps of meat in there and frozen vegetables and shit like that.
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  14. intersubjectivity
    • 1988 November 4, Fred Camper, “In the Eye of the Beholder”, Chicago Reader:
      Mangolte has acknowledged that Henry James is of great importance to her, and indeed the complex intersubjectivity of his writing, in which we of ten come to know a central character not through his action but through the way in which he observes others, is somewhat mirrored in the structure of The Cold Eye.
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  15. leafleteers
    • 1988 November 4, Alida M. Jatich, “Religious Intolerance”, Chicago Reader:
      After reading Grant Pick's overly sympathetic article about the religious leafleteers, "This Could Be Your Last 5 Minutes Alive!
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  16. majick
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      Burger, though, is a discarder rather than a collector; what items there are have a personal or aesthetic appeal: a few bits of stone that look like a miniature segment of Stonehenge; a pack of Max Maven playing cards, named after a famous "mentalist," a good friend of Burger's; a couple of trick devices, including one shaped like a skull; and a few lavishly weird "bizarre majick" books, these the work of Tony Andruzzi, a local magician.
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  17. megastructure
  18. microcity
  19. nonnarrative
    • 1988 November 4, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Onion City Film Festival”, Chicago Reader:
      The animated Machine Song (Chel White) and Bar Yohai (Robert Asher), and the evocative nonnarrative What's Left Is Wind (Leighton Pierce)--all showing on Saturday--are strikingly fresh.
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  20. nonstatement
    • 1988 November 4, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      "A boycott was clearly a nonstatement," says gallery owner Richard L. Feigen, who thought the only ones who would suffer from the boycott would be Chicago artists.
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  21. nonsupernaturalists
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      ) For those who did believe in God, "there were the supernaturalists, and the nonsupernaturalists, which is to say those who thought that we can perfectly well deal with god languages, god talk, in ways that don't have to refer to a spirit being out there.
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  22. pistonlike
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      After each person had seen his or her card, Veckey, when he squared the deck, pulled the card out of the deck in a splendid pistonlike movement and dragged it around to be palmed in his right hand, facing him.
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  23. pontificators
    • 1988 November 4, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Lies of the Mind”, Chicago Reader:
      Rather like Tati's Playtime--the supreme "open" narrative work in movies that treats viewers and characters alike as distracted tourists--Talking to Strangers both offers and addresses itself to a gaggle of pontificators, theorists, and con artists who all play at constructing reality and themselves, at the same time and in the same gestures.
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  24. preplanning
    • 1988 November 4, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Lies of the Mind”, Chicago Reader:
      Financed and photographed by the writer-director himself, a Baltimore resident who raised the money by making TV commercials, it combines the rigors of elaborate preplanning with the bold risk taking of an aleatory event.
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  25. preshow
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      Burger does a few more small tricks as the preshow crowd in the bar grows.
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  26. proconvention
    • 1988 November 4, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      A new state constitutional convention could not limit individual liberties, according to the proconvention group Con Con for Court Reform.
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  27. semiserious
    • 1988 November 4, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      Rosenblum's semiserious survey of dogs in art illustrates major cultural and social changes over the centuries.
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  28. shorthaired
    • 1988 November 4, Chris Petrakos, “Costume Contest”, Chicago Reader:
      "He's really a black-and-white shorthaired cat named Bogart, in case you can't tell.
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  29. socioeconomically
    • 1988 November 4, Peter Friederici, “Significant Moments”, Chicago Reader:
      The students of Cambridge Rindge & Latin may consider this a good record of their racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically mixed school.
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  30. stockcars
    • 1988 November 4, Lawrence Bommer, “Chicago Fun Times: running off to join the circus”, Chicago Reader:
      Steele's train has 27 coaches plus stockcars and flatcars for the ornate prop wagons and tents; surprisingly, the whole show can be torn down and loaded in only four and a half hours.
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  31. styrofoam
    • 1988 November 4, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      A while ago I read your column concerning the effects of hot tea on styrofoam cups.
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  32. supernaturalists
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      ) For those who did believe in God, "there were the supernaturalists, and the nonsupernaturalists, which is to say those who thought that we can perfectly well deal with god languages, god talk, in ways that don't have to refer to a spirit being out there.
      add
  33. tonier
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      It is 11 o'clock in the morning--quite early for Eugene Burger, who avoids daylight whenever possible--in the restaurant of one of Rush Street's tonier hotels.
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  34. ultrapop
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Let's Active”, Chicago Reader:
      On his third full-length record, Every Dog Has Its Day, prodigy producer and ultrapop songster Mitch Easter continues his search for the perfect hook.
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  35. univocally
    • 1988 November 4, Fred Camper, “In the Eye of the Beholder”, Chicago Reader:
      Part of the film's richness is that the art world is neither univocally praised nor condemned.
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  36. unparticular
    • 1988 November 4, Bill Wyman, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, Chicago Reader:
      Many--most--of the members of his profession collect books and gewgaws and mail-order items and other magical paraphernalia with the unparticular enthusiasm of teenagers.
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  37. woodcutlike
    • 1988 November 4, Helene R. Baker, “Last Letters From Stalingrad”, Chicago Reader:
      Another addition that seemed unnecessary was the projection of several unfathomable woodcutlike prints.
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Sequestered[edit]