User:Visviva/Reader 19881111

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (1988-11-04) Words harvested from the Chicago Reader, 1988-11-11
  • List status: open
→ Next (1988-11-18)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-11-11 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

[ see all Reader pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

46541 tokens ‧ 35871 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 6806 types ‧ 57 (~ 0.837%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-11-11[edit]

  1. anticommunication
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      On the other hand, maybe it is quite appropriate that a confused, incoherent body of theory should be applied to the confused incoherence of MTV. Indeed, Neil Postman could as easily have been describing either postmodern theory or music television when he wrote about TV news: "Embedded in the surrealistic frame of a television news show is a theory of anticommunication, featuring a type of discourse that abandons logic, reason, sequence, and rules of contradiction.
      add
  2. antidevelopment
    • 1988 November 11, Albert Williams, “An American Dream”, Chicago Reader:
      His life in ruins, Winslow goes off in search of work and finds, yes folks, America: an America populated by cute homeless alcoholics, earnest but unemployed middle-class parents, rabble-rousing young punk anarchists, and corrupt preacher-politicians ("Leave Uptown to the downtrodden," spouts one streetwise demagogue in a timely reference to the Tribune's series on antidevelopment activists).
      add
  3. antinarratives
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      She sees the techniques of modernism in evidence on MTV--the antinarratives, the jump cuts, the subversions of the frame, and so on--but points out that they aren't used for any apparently coherent purpose.
      add
  4. antiporn
  5. antiracist
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Bloom's ignorance of contemporary Marxist theory is complemented by a similarly anachronistic understanding of feminist and antiracist theory and practice.
      add
  6. battements
    • 1988 November 11, Cerinda Survant, “Hubbard Street Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      The lover steps easily in and out of the table frame, the father with battements like goose steps.
      add
  7. colorized
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      He argues that television has taken over our culture, imposing its values on all significant forms of public discourse: politics (elections as a bow-tie contest); religion (preaching as a televisual activity); newspapers (the colorized simplicities of USA Today); education (Sesame Street and the expectation among students that they should be entertained in the classroom and lecture theater), and, of course, the dominance of TV itself in our use of leisure time.
      add
  8. counterimpulse
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      This counterimpulse tends to embrace everything difficult and European with juvenile zeal.
      add
  9. dancelike
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “Rituals”, Chicago Reader:
      Then they light a small fire, and proceed to perform a series of klunky, dancelike movements--lighting punks, throwing salt into the fire.
      add
  10. deadeningly
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “David Puszch Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      What makes this dance unengaging, aside from its deadeningly solemn air, is Puszczewicz's inability to send his dancers in any particular direction.
      add
  11. decertify
    • 1988 November 11, Michael Miner, “Strike Accord at the Tribune; Is the Sun-Times Next?”, Chicago Reader:
      As Sallas immediately said, the 130 scabs who so easily replaced the striking printers in '85 won't be foisted upon the union--to degrade it and possibly decertify it.
      add
  12. defeatedly
    • 1988 November 11, Laura Molzahn, “About Men”, Chicago Reader:
      At first he sits defeatedly on a chair, but then suddenly he raises all four limbs, stiff and straight, like a shout to heaven, his belly hollowed out, in a gesture that epitomizes vulnerability and supplication.
      add
  13. dessicated
    • 1988 November 11, Tom Boeker, “Hair”, Chicago Reader:
      We see Hair intact, yet dessicated.
      add
  14. economism
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Crude old Marxist economism is abandoned, and new concepts, derived from psychoanalysis and feminism, take their place.
      add
  15. faves
    • 1988 November 11, Achy Obejas, “Bluebeard”, Chicago Reader:
      Ludlam, one of the founders of the Ridiculous Theatre, borrows heavily from Oscar Wilde, Doctor Faustus, the Supremes, Betty Boop, and a whole smorgasbord of other pop culture faves to come up with this campy story about a mad scientist in search of perfect sex.
      add
  16. hippiedom
    • 1988 November 11, Tom Boeker, “Hair”, Chicago Reader:
      But James, unlike the rest, avoids the pitfall of trying to figure out what constitutes hippiedom and concentrates instead on Claude's insecurity and passivity about his impending induction.
      add
  17. injokes
    • 1988 November 11, Laura Molzahn, “About Men”, Chicago Reader:
      This metadance, full of paradoxes and dead ends (and injokes that I won't spoil by telling), laughs at the critics, laughs at the audience, but laughs most of all at itself.
      add
  18. klunky
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “Rituals”, Chicago Reader:
      Then they light a small fire, and proceed to perform a series of klunky, dancelike movements--lighting punks, throwing salt into the fire.
      add
  19. metadance
    • 1988 November 11, Laura Molzahn, “About Men”, Chicago Reader:
      This metadance, full of paradoxes and dead ends (and injokes that I won't spoil by telling), laughs at the critics, laughs at the audience, but laughs most of all at itself.
      add
  20. multiculturalist
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Conservatives typically pretend to be apolitical, beyond ideology, etc, even as they smuggle in their "value-free" program for a nationalist, multiculturalist meritocracy.
      add
  21. multiunit
    • 1988 November 11, Robert McClory, “The Philosophy of Garbage”, Chicago Reader:
      2 million tons (or 3,300 tons a day), and private haulers, who service multiunit residential buildings and businesses, take up the remaining 1. 3 million tons (3,500 tons a day).
      add
  22. nongypsy
    • 1988 November 11, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      Gypsies enjoy a reputation for natural musicianship, and their passionate repertoire has inspired nongypsy composers such as Liszt, Brahms, Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Strauss.
      add
  23. nonhierarchically
    • 1988 November 11, Anthony Adler, “The Troupe With No Head”, Chicago Reader:
      They build their shows collectively, nonhierarchically, developing scripts as a group and working without benefit of a "director" in the conventional sense of the word--forming instead a sort of directorate of the whole.
      add
  24. oppositional
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      The often unconsciously oppositional or progressive elements of popular culture are stressed.
      add
  25. overgeneralization
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Fortunately for all of us, the rhetoric of both cultural pessimism and postmodernism contains more than its fair share of exaggeration and overgeneralization.
      add
  26. overliteral
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “David Puszch Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      The narrators--Julie Alexander, Kevin McCoy, and Diana Zimmer--mostly stand on the sidelines explaining the oversimplified plots while the company dances around in overliteral interpretations of whatever the narrators have just said.
      add
  27. partiers
    • 1988 November 11, David Whiteis, “The well-trained pianist”, Chicago Reader:
      Although many veteran musicians can move effortlessly from gutbucket celebration to introspection, too often younger artists seem bent on casting themselves as either moody balladeers or funky partiers.
      add
  28. pasteup
    • 1988 November 11, Michael Miner, “Strike Accord at the Tribune; Is the Sun-Times Next?”, Chicago Reader:
      (He'll be replaced, if he's replaced at all, by a "typographical associate" paid much less money to do the dwindling amount of makeup and pasteup work that everyone acknowledges is obsolete.
      add
  29. pedagogies
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Most of Hirsch's book is an overextended effort to document this thesis, which is posed as an alternative to "progressivist" pedagogies founded on the educational philosophies of Dewey and Rousseau.
      add
  30. phenobarbitals
    • 1988 November 11, Tom Boeker, “The Maids”, Chicago Reader:
      So Claire serves the Madame a cup of tea with ten phenobarbitals in it.
      add
  31. plie
    • 1988 November 11, Cerinda Survant, “Hubbard Street Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      Certain movement images recur-popping out of line, a gentle releve enlivened by a twist of the pelvis, a surprising drop back into plie.
      add
  32. poleboat
    • 1988 November 11, Hank De Zutter, “On Stage: Jim Post's motherlode of music and history”, Chicago Reader:
      For it features flesh-and-blood characters--Indians betrayed, a runaway slave recaptured and freed, an Irish fugitive caught with his pants down, a pioneer woman uncertain about starting over in a town without lace curtains, and Mississippi River poleboat men, fueled by little more than dreams and drafts of whiskey--the whiskey, Post claims with ample historical evidence, that "won the west.
      add
  33. postfeminist
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      We inhabit a culture that has been variously described over the last 20 years or so as postindustrial, postideological, post-Holocaust, postfeminist, postpunk, and, naturally, postmodern.
      add
  34. postideological
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      We inhabit a culture that has been variously described over the last 20 years or so as postindustrial, postideological, post-Holocaust, postfeminist, postpunk, and, naturally, postmodern.
      add
  35. prepsychedelic
    • 1988 November 11, Albert Williams, “An American Dream”, Chicago Reader:
      Lehrer's songs--cynical and sarcastic, Tin Pan Alley style black humor, as if Lenny Bruce teamed up with Lerner and Loewe--were welcome assaults on the bland conformism of their day, the prepsychedelic early 1960s; we could use some of that biting comedy in the yuppified 80s, and David Whitehouse and Andy Miller, whose songs form the spine of this brief show, seem willing to oblige.
      add
  36. preshow
    • 1988 November 11, Diana Spinrad, “Drinking in America”, Chicago Reader:
      His choice of music for preshow and intermission set the tone for what was to follow.
      add
  37. progressivist
    • 1988 November 11, Andrew Goodwin, “Reading: The Cultural Crash of '89”, Chicago Reader:
      Most of Hirsch's book is an overextended effort to document this thesis, which is posed as an alternative to "progressivist" pedagogies founded on the educational philosophies of Dewey and Rousseau.
      add
  38. psychodramatic
    • 1988 November 11, Tom Boeker, “The Maids”, Chicago Reader:
      To make an obscure point clearer--at the risk of dreadfully oversimplifying Genet's complex approach to drama--I'd say that The Maids is the psychodramatic equivalent of a Saturday night in an S and M rodeo bar.
      add
  39. remanufacture
    • 1988 November 11, Robert McClory, “The Philosophy of Garbage”, Chicago Reader:
      And we need miners to extract the material, processing centers to prepare it for market, factories to remanufacture it, salespeople to sell the new products, and investors to finance the new companies.
      add
  40. ritornellos
    • 1988 November 11, Ted Shen, “Chicago String Ensemble”, Chicago Reader:
      Estro, incidentally, means heat, and these pieces, with their magnificent ritornellos and spirited solos, indeed radiate energy, passion, and a refreshing perkiness.
      add
  41. talkiness
  42. unengaging
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “David Puszch Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      What makes this dance unengaging, aside from its deadeningly solemn air, is Puszczewicz's inability to send his dancers in any particular direction.
      add
  43. ungenuine
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “David Puszch Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      Throughout these misery-provoked actions, the dancers appeared markedly ungenuine.
      add
  44. unintelligently
    • 1988 November 11, Justin Hayford, “David Puszch Dance Company”, Chicago Reader:
      The concert was not only poorly paced and unintelligently arranged--Just Affairs and Wounds of My Belief, two dark, slow pieces, were followed by an intermission--it bordered on the truly offensive.
      add
  45. unmusicality
    • 1988 November 11, Albert Williams, “An American Dream”, Chicago Reader:
      ) Composer Whitehouse, who also plays piano, appropriates from a diverse range of styles--musical comedy, blues, Bach chorales, even a Brahmsian lullaby--but his compositional versatility is obscured by the insistent unmusicality of the actors' raucous, tuneless singing.
      add
  46. unspontaneous
    • 1988 November 11, Lawrence Bommer, “Labor Relations”, Chicago Reader:
      Like Pullman's tomb, Beckett's dialogue is encased in its own concrete, in a stilted, unspontaneous delivery.
      add
  47. unsubsidized
    • 1988 November 11, Robert McClory, “The Philosophy of Garbage”, Chicago Reader:
      And the person responsible for much of that is an unsubsidized, unorthodox junk man, Ken Dunn, who preaches more by doing than by talking and who hopes the day of general awakening will come before the day of grim reckoning.
      add
  48. utopians
    • 1988 November 11, Anthony Adler, “The Troupe With No Head”, Chicago Reader:
      They're true utopians, trying to build a method consistent with their communal message.
      add
  49. weatherbeaten
    • 1988 November 11, Robert McClory, “The Philosophy of Garbage”, Chicago Reader:
      He comes back in a moment carrying a somewhat weatherbeaten but intact computer--keyboard, screen, and wiring.
      add

Sequestered[edit]