User:Visviva/Reader 19881209

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-12-09 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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37105 tokens ‧ 27846 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5221 types ‧ 33 (~ 0.632%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-12-09[edit]

  1. agatite
  2. antidocumentary
    • 1988 December 9, James Krohe Jr., “Media: Not Made for TV”, Chicago Reader:
      " Edwin Diamond, the critic with New York University's News Study Group, dismissed as "antidocumentary" and "infotainment" such aberrations as Scared Sexless, NBC's report on sexually transmitted diseases.
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  3. arpeggiated
    • 1988 December 9, Alex Wilding-White, “Ho and Hum: Is success spoiling U2?”, Chicago Reader:
      "Sunday Bloody Sunday" uses the simplest of arpeggiated figures for its melodic lead, but the power and conviction with which it is played, coming off an equally simple but fiery drum intro and going into the body of the song, makes it sound appropriate, almost logical.
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  4. blubberers
    • 1988 December 9, Ben Joravsky, “Property-tax assessments rise; north siders are revolting”, Chicago Reader:
      ) Some of the loudest blubberers are developers who, having made enormous profits as a result of local, state, and federal subsidies, complain that government doesn't do enough for them.
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  5. codirector
    • 1988 December 9, James Krohe Jr., “Media: Not Made for TV”, Chicago Reader:
      The film's codirector explained that she'd aimed to convey an emotional understanding of the topic through what she called her "highly lyric and stylized form of documentary"; John Corry, then a New York Times TV critic, derided such an approach as vanity.
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  6. craftsmanlike
    • 1988 December 9, James Krohe Jr., “Media: Not Made for TV”, Chicago Reader:
      Even so, some knowledgeable critics charge that PBS documentaries have more and more been expected to conform to "professional" standards that require a craftsmanlike neutrality.
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  7. creche
    • 1988 December 9, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      Beyond creche and menorah.
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  8. embryonically
    • 1988 December 9, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Anything for a Laugh”, Chicago Reader:
      This vein, which already existed embryonically in Airplane! , developed into a zone of surreal whimsy and sheer weirdness that was often indulged in simply for its own sake.
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  9. encoring
    • 1988 December 9, Alex Wilding-White, “Ho and Hum: Is success spoiling U2?”, Chicago Reader:
      Onstage, the band would do well to shuffle what's become a rather routine song order, using their hit "New Year's Day," for example, as an opener instead of a predictable closer, and encoring perhaps with an unrecorded song instead of "40" for the umpteen-millionth time.
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  10. ethnosemantics
    • 1988 December 9, Thomas Kochman, “More on Rules of Discourse”, Chicago Reader:
      Mr. DuBrul would do well to take a course in linguistic and/or cultural anthropology, especially ethnosemantics.
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  11. factualizing
    • 1988 December 9, James Krohe Jr., “Media: Not Made for TV”, Chicago Reader:
      Without them, one ends up factualizing fiction.
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  12. faves
    • 1988 December 9, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      After a few warm-up choruses of "Jingle Bells" and other faves, carolers will serenade the residents of the primate and reptile houses and the Children's Zoo. The Glen Ellyn Children's Chorus, the Young Naperville Singers, the Jubilate!
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  13. feetfirst
    • 1988 December 9, Ben Joravsky, “No-Ice Hockey”, Chicago Reader:
      So DeCamilli, sliding feetfirst, undercuts the Bomber and sends him sliding into the wall.
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  14. hellenized
    • 1988 December 9, George Grass, “Prophet on a Platter”, Chicago Reader:
      Before then, she had had only a small role in the story of Herod and John the Baptist in the gospels of Mark and Matthew and in the histories of the hellenized Jew, Flavius Josephus.
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  15. housedress
    • 1988 December 9, Tom Boeker, “Playwright on a Skewer”, Chicago Reader:
      It's more flak from the past-Patti Smith back in a housedress.
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  16. immatures
    • 1988 December 9, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      I have seen one male on the lake in my years of looking, but almost all the birds we get here are either females or young of the year, immatures whose plumage is very similar to the coloring of the females.
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  17. literates
    • 1988 December 9, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      Beware of cultural literates.
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  18. mandolinlike
    • 1988 December 9, Alex Wilding-White, “Ho and Hum: Is success spoiling U2?”, Chicago Reader:
      The Joshua Tree and the ensuing tour were, by any definition, major successes, and the record showed some new twists in the band's sound: The Edge's distinctive mandolinlike upper-position chord fills took on a more sparkling quality, and Bono added some depth to his singing.
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  19. minimart
    • 1988 December 9, Ben Joravsky, “No-Ice Hockey”, Chicago Reader:
      Go to the minimart and get me a cold Lite.
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  20. mylar
    • 1988 December 9, Peter Friederici, “Rockwell on a Plate”, Chicago Reader:
      His listeners sat at little wooden tables, some distracted by the reflections of plants shifting and dissolving in the swaying mylar.
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  21. nonblack
    • 1988 December 9, Florence Hamlish Levinsohn, “Mayoral Candidates on the Starting Line”, Chicago Reader:
      Plus, if they all stay in, some black voters--10, 20, 30 percent--will say, 'My goodness, if we're not going to get a black mayor, who is the best nonblack to support?
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  22. noncomic
    • 1988 December 9, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Anything for a Laugh”, Chicago Reader:
      An early (1957) and mainly forgotten version of the genre known as Zero Hour served as the filmmakers' model, and an effective use of familiar noncomic stock actors--Robert Stack, Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, and Leslie Nielsen--helped spike the satire.
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  23. nonfunctioning
    • 1988 December 9, Michael Miner, “One Determined Jailbird”, Chicago Reader:
      But we'd interviewed Teague for the Sun-Times a day or two after his arrest outside the A&P and a sharp state's attorney dug up the story and decided that it debunked Teague's claim of a nonfunctioning memory.
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  24. overassessed
  25. overloud
    • 1988 December 9, Albert Williams, “A Christmas Carol”, Chicago Reader:
      Though there are some individual acting problems--mainly inconsistent and/or overdone British accents and frequent difficulty in projecting the lines (especially over Larry Schanker's lush but sometimes overloud synthesizer score)--there is a wonderful feeling of ensemble among the cast; and William J. Norris, in his tenth season as Scrooge, makes the very most of his role as both protagonist in the story and observer of it.
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  26. ponytailed
    • 1988 December 9, Peter Friederici, “Rockwell on a Plate”, Chicago Reader:
      As he did so a couple walked in the door and mounted the platform: a young woman with a long dress and a snow white wig, and a ponytailed young man wearing a colonial soldier's cape and sword.
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  27. styrofoam
    • 1988 December 9, M. Wiesinger, “Plastics”, Chicago Reader:
      National Gardening magazine reports that "plastics now [make] up almost a third (by volume) of the waste discarded in the U. S. " Let's face it folks--barring incineration, which fouls the air and water, yesterday's empty milk jug, last week's spent Downy bottle, today's styrofoam meat trays, and others of their ilk will still be around when your children are old!
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  28. thickheadedly
    • 1988 December 9, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Anything for a Laugh”, Chicago Reader:
      Here he plays LA cop Frank Drebin, thickheadedly matching his wits against wealthy villain Vincent Ludwig (Ricardo Montalban)--who, for reasons that remain obscure to me, is plotting the assassination of Queen Elizabeth II (played by look-alike Jeannette Charles) at a California Angels baseball game.
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  29. underassessed

Sequestered[edit]