User:Visviva/Reader 19891222

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1989-12-22 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-15).

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49004 tokens ‧ 34516 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 6466 types ‧ 84 (~ 1.299%) words before cleaning ‧ 60 (~ 0.928%) accepted words

1989-12-22[edit]

  1. automotivedom
    • 1989 December 22, Don Rose, “The Abominable Snow Job”, Chicago Reader:
      The Mercedes Benz Award to Congressman Dan Rostenkowski for the cleverest hood ornament in all automotivedom: a senior citizen sprawled there as he drove through a flock of elderly folk protesting a health-care law.
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  2. avuncularly
    • 1989 December 22, Don Rose, “The Abominable Snow Job”, Chicago Reader:
      Then there was Hugh Hill's avuncularly loving coverage nightly on Channel Seven.
      add
  3. bikewear
    • 1989 December 22, Vicki Quade, “North Pier, We Fear”, Chicago Reader:
      Turin: An entire store devoted to spandex bikewear.
      add
  4. boyfrienditis
    • 1989 December 22, Samuel Willis, “Year of the Bat”, Chicago Reader:
      The champion producer, a pal of Sue's with boyfrienditis, probably cut 600 all by herself.
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  5. broast
    • 1989 December 22, Mark Caro, “Toast”, Chicago Reader:
      Is it broast?
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  6. budgeters
    • 1989 December 22, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurants: The End of Two Eras”, Chicago Reader:
      It was also a bargain, even then: five dollars for pate, soup, salad, entree, dessert, and coffee; and, a boon for budgeters, BYO booze.
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  7. chachaaaaaed
    • 1989 December 22, Regina Mary White, “How to Get on Sneed's Good Side”, Chicago Reader:
      Just suffice it to say the ethnic bloc that will be wooed, cooed, feted, chachaaaaaed and merengued is .
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  8. cochairmen
  9. corpsechewer
    • 1989 December 22, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Which ends the decade on a note of innocence lost, of corpsechewer time marching on.
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  10. crispened
    • 1989 December 22, Mark Caro, “Toast”, Chicago Reader:
      The surface has crispened, but it isn't brown.
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  11. dabblings
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      McCartney was an immediate and grand attempt at demystification, almost demythologization: it was (younger readers will want to know) a "home album" filled with lovable McCartneyesque hummings and dabblings about love and romance and the joys of quotidian existence, as far removed in conception and execution from his last recording project (side two of Abbey Road) as you could imagine.
      add
  12. deprogrammer
    • 1989 December 22, Mary Shen Barnidge, “Buddah Haus”, Chicago Reader:
      They attempt to dissuade him from his philanthropic mission, even to the extent of hiring Lucite, the top deprogrammer in the country, to unscramble the lad's brains.
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  13. ditziness
    • 1989 December 22, Mary Shen Barnidge, “Buddah Haus”, Chicago Reader:
      The gangly Bill Bonneau radiates a youthful purity as the idealistic Warren Peece; Joel Sanchez and Cheryl Anderson are suitably spaced-out as Art and Bernice (Anderson has a fresh-faced ditziness reminiscent of the early Lynn Redgrave); and Chanda Willis displays versatility in the roles of Saul Suburban, Denise Design, Ed Centre, and the correspondent for the Daily Grind.
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  14. documentations
    • 1989 December 22, Paul Pekin, “A Low Interest Year”, Chicago Reader:
      There must be records, proper documentations, certified witnesses, paperwork.
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  15. eephus
    • 1989 December 22, Geoffrey Johnson, “People Who Died”, Chicago Reader:
      "Throw that blooper pitch and see if you can wake up this crowd," commanded Grimm, alluding to Sewell's unorthodox "eephus" pitch, which arced to a height of 25 feet before plummeting toward home plate.
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  16. eliminatory
    • 1989 December 22, Hank De Zutter and Thom Clark, “Fashion Accessory of the Year”, Chicago Reader:
      First there are what we might call eliminatory difficulties.
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  17. endism
    • 1989 December 22, Tom Panelas, “The End of History?”, Chicago Reader:
      But of course that question misses the point, which is that endism plays well in the press and inside the Beltway and satisfies our hunger for sententious explanations.
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  18. exploitive
    • 1989 December 22, Anthony Adler, “Spouting Off”, Chicago Reader:
      Meshed not in a violent or exploitive way, interestingly enough, but sweetly.
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  19. grinchy
    • 1989 December 22, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      "Every year when Christmas arrives, a grinchy ol' feeling wells up inside," sings Valerie Lewis in her new holiday carol, "Christmastime at the Mall.
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  20. heartcraft
    • 1989 December 22, Lawrence Bommer, “The Little Prince”, Chicago Reader:
      The Little Prince may praise what's "invisible to the eye," but what Touchstone Theatre offers is as much solid spectacle as it is heartcraft.
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  21. hokeyness
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      Lasers--a mid-70s specialty that in the 80s have been reserved for Pink Floyd shows--were present, as was some similarly dated hokeyness with rising platforms and such.
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  22. homoeroticism
    • 1989 December 22, Patricia Stoll, “Hanging Out at the Art Institute”, Chicago Reader:
      "In July, the Senate voted to bar the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA] from using Federal funds to 'promote, disseminate or produce obscene or indecent materials, including but not limited to depictions of sadomasochism, homoeroticism, the exploitation of children, or individuals engaged in sex acts, or material which denigrates the objects or beliefs of the adherents of a particular religion or nonreligion.' The bill, sponsored by Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina, would also bar grants for artwork that "denigrates, debases, or reviles a person, group or class of citizens on the basis of race, creed, sex, handicap, age or national origin.
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  23. hummings
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      McCartney was an immediate and grand attempt at demystification, almost demythologization: it was (younger readers will want to know) a "home album" filled with lovable McCartneyesque hummings and dabblings about love and romance and the joys of quotidian existence, as far removed in conception and execution from his last recording project (side two of Abbey Road) as you could imagine.
      add
  24. intraparty
  25. jewellike
    • 1989 December 22, S.L. Wisenberg, “The Year in Sports”, Chicago Reader:
      A cardinal is jewellike.
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  26. listomania
    • 1989 December 22, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Listomania”, Chicago Reader:
      So pronounced, in fact, is this listomania concerning the 80s that in many cases it had already moved into full gear by late October, while the decade still had a good nine or ten weeks to go.
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  27. literalizes
    • 1989 December 22, Justin Hayford, “A Body of One's Own”, Chicago Reader:
      Often, too, the text unfortunately literalizes the poetic images onstage.
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  28. merengued
    • 1989 December 22, Regina Mary White, “How to Get on Sneed's Good Side”, Chicago Reader:
      Just suffice it to say the ethnic bloc that will be wooed, cooed, feted, chachaaaaaed and merengued is .
      add
  29. mermen
    • 1989 December 22, Patricia Stoll, “Hanging Out at the Art Institute”, Chicago Reader:
      Check out the fountain: four greenish anatomically correct mermen wrestling with fish.
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  30. midthigh
    • 1989 December 22, Patricia Stoll, “Hanging Out at the Art Institute”, Chicago Reader:
      One diptych showed a male torso from navel to midthigh; the whole piece was six feet by nine feet; you can imagine the size of the penis.)
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  31. midwesterners
    • 1989 December 22, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurants: The End of Two Eras”, Chicago Reader:
      Of course one had to choose properly, and midwesterners are not accustomed to taking food so seriously.
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  32. mucho
    • 1989 December 22, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      There will be calamities, maudlin melodramas, and mucho pathos at Cries & Whispers--A Tragedy Club, which seeks to reverse our town's love of comedy.
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  33. muckabilly
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Tav Falco's Panther Burns”, Chicago Reader:
      He certainly is an aficionado of southern muck rock, and he fronts a band, Panther Burns, that plays a potent, eerily corporeal strain of mucked-up rockabilly (muckabilly?).
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  34. normatively
    • 1989 December 22, Justin Hayford, “A Body of One's Own”, Chicago Reader:
      The female body, particularly in artistic representation, is normatively portrayed as the object/fulfillment of male fantasy.
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  35. overimposes
  36. pitchout
    • 1989 December 22, Richard Lalich, “What'd He Say?”, Chicago Reader:
      October 5: As Dunston breaks for second, Girardi throws his bat at a pitchout.
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  37. prepunk
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      None of it is exactly coherent, and parts are marginal, but I think it does represent some sort of point of grandeur in prepunk 70s pop.
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  38. prevaricating
    • 1989 December 22, Lawrence Bommer, “The Little Prince”, Chicago Reader:
      It came to him, blown by the wind, as a seed and has now grown into the proud, selfish, artfully prevaricating Rose.
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  39. princeling
    • 1989 December 22, Lawrence Bommer, “The Little Prince”, Chicago Reader:
      By the time our princeling reaches earth, he's homesick for his Rose, especially since a doddering geographer has scared him by telling him his Rose is less important than a mountain because the Rose is only "ephemeral.
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  40. prochoice
    • 1989 December 22, Don Rose, “The Abominable Snow Job”, Chicago Reader:
      But this year the winds changed and Hartigan became "prochoice.
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  41. profundities
    • 1989 December 22, Gary Kamiya, “Zen and the Art of Advertising Copy”, Chicago Reader:
      By babbling pidgin English profundities, Nissan has elevated the concept of Luxury to quasi-mystical status.
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  42. rai
    • 1989 December 22, Ted Cox, “Pop: Year of the Woman II”, Chicago Reader:
      The packaging, manipulation, and commercialization of the female image--while nothing new--reached such an extent in the record business this year that I turned increasingly to world-music stars such as Chaba Fadela (who sings North African rai music) and Najma (who sings Indian ghazal poetry).
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  43. rootedness
    • 1989 December 22, Mary Wisniewski, “Giving Shelter: a west-side boy comes home”, Chicago Reader:
      An uncle might be around to offer a spare bedroom, or a job at the plant, or the church might be there for guidance, for rootedness.
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  44. rotisseur
    • 1989 December 22, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurants: The End of Two Eras”, Chicago Reader:
      With an admirably single-minded focus, Friedman serves roasted and grilled meat and fish that demonstrate why the French place the rotisseur above the saucier in the pantheon of the kitchen gods.
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  45. rottweiler
    • 1989 December 22, P.S. Mueller, “A Major Year for Walter Parkay”, Chicago Reader:
      I burned and earned, bought a bigger Toyota, leveraged a larger portfolio, and raised a rottweiler the size of a couch.
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  46. semiabstract
    • 1989 December 22, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “New Festival of Animation”, Chicago Reader:
      Highlights include John Lasseter's Knickknack (in 3-D, complete with glasses); Arnie Lipsey's Canadian Jewish anecdote The Crow and the Canary; Steve Goldberg's computer-generated Locomotion; Erica Russell's cubist and semiabstract dance film from England, Feet of Song; and Brett Thompson and Ian Gooding's hilarious time-travel tale, The Housekeeper.
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  47. semipopular
    • 1989 December 22, Ted Cox, “Pop: Year of the Woman II”, Chicago Reader:
      Yet while 1988's claim to the title was based on the mass-market breakout of a select few semipopular artists addressing feminist concerns thought "sure" to alienate a wide audience (Tracy Chapman, Suzanne Vega, Michelle Shocked, etc), 1989's Year of the Woman was based on simple chart success.
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  48. slipperlike
    • 1989 December 22, Jessica Slosberg, “Chi Lives: adapting to adoption with Shinhee Han”, Chicago Reader:
      Han's thick, dark hair, oversize Cats T-shirt that's rolled up at the sleeves, and baggy khaki pants that fall over black suede slipperlike shoes make her look more like an older sister than the group leader.
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  49. songwriterly
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      Others exist; Costello played one at Poplar Creek last year.) While these songs are, lyrically at least, a little stronger than the usual McCartney whimsy, they reek so much of a calculated and somewhat cold songwriterly competence that it's hard to enjoy them.
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  50. spouteur
    • 1989 December 22, Anthony Adler, “Spouting Off”, Chicago Reader:
      Specifically, the urban spouteur.
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  51. stagebound
    • 1989 December 22, Jack Helbig, “Sleuth”, Chicago Reader:
      But the playwright is stagebound: the best he or she can provide (in cinematic terms) is a series of medium-long shots.
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  52. stockingful
    • 1989 December 22, Albert Williams, “Songs of the Season”, Chicago Reader:
      Musical director Mark Elliott has unearthed a giant sized stockingful of songs for the likable eight-person cast--classic carols and pop standards like "Silver Bells," "Baby, It's Cold Outside," and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," but also less familiar fare from such artists as Meredith Willson, Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn, Peter Link and Jacob Brackman, Frank Loesser, Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick, Victor Young, Peter "PDQ Bach" Schickele, and the Eagles.
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  53. sucrosey
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      Leaving aside the songs that are marginal, even the most cloyingly charming McCartney number--like the sucrosey "Put It There"--is just too sophisticated, too precise, too advanced for anything like commercial radio--it's pop music raised to the level of abstraction.
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  54. tankdom
    • 1989 December 22, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Hey, you great festering gob of knowledge, why are those bastions of suburban tankdom known as station wagons?
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  55. uncategorizable
    • 1989 December 22, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Listomania”, Chicago Reader:
      A Story of the Wind* (Joris Ivens and Marceline Loridan, 1988--an uncategorizable essay film that also employs fiction)
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  56. uncoverings
    • 1989 December 22, Justin Hayford, “A Body of One's Own”, Chicago Reader:
      This intricate scene presents two uncoverings, both of which are only partially revealed to us.
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  57. universalization
    • 1989 December 22, Tom Panelas, “The End of History?”, Chicago Reader:
      Writing in the summer issue of the neoconservative quarterly The National Interest, Fukuyama proclaimed that the dissolution of the Soviet bloc spelled not only the end of the Cold War but "the end of history as such: that is, the end point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.
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  58. unobsessive
    • 1989 December 22, Bill Wyman, “Let him be”, Chicago Reader:
      The inanities and novelties are irritating, but you have to credit the insistence: year after year McCartney has demanded, in a straightforward, unobsessive fashion, that we accept him as just plain old Paul McCartney, and not as the ex-Beatle or former partner of John Lennon.
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  59. upcourt
    • 1989 December 22, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Georgetown had a chance to win, but Fred Brown dribbled the ball upcourt, crossed the centerline, and then passed it directly to James Worthy, a North Carolina player, thinking he was a teammate.
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  60. workworld
    • 1989 December 22, Cate Plys, “Would You Hire This Man?”, Chicago Reader:
      First we checked on Pavarotti's prospects in the everyday workworld.
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Sequestered[edit]