User talk:CyclePat

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

I've made some past edit's here. User talk:74.101.14.217

I knew you that would happen[edit]

Why did you put a reference for wickiup on the wikiwiki page? --EncycloPetey 02:53, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

I noticed most definitions don't have a reference. Wikiup, the one you removed has a close etymological reference to the term wiki.
No, it doesn't. The word wickiup comes from an Algonquin language on eastern North America. The word wikiwiki comes from Hawaiian, a Polynesian language spoken in the western Pacific Ocean. There is no connection. --EncycloPetey 03:01, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

I don't understand what your saying. What I mean is, I'm not seeing the link or in this case I don't see the reference. Yes! We agree that Alquonquin is from eastern North America. In fact according to the National Archives Canada, and what I've learnt through grade school, Algonquin is a native tribe from my home town here in Ottawa.[1] But I don't see the link or any references with the work wickiup. In fact the definition I have found places the word at the opposite end of North America. The word wickiup, according to Encarta (as now referenced in the article), is a "Native N American hut: a hut made by Native North Americans of the southwestern United States by covering a framework of arched poles with mats of bark, grass, or branches." We are missing an important resource to explain why, according you, it is related to Algonquin. Southwestern United States, last I check, was closer to Hawaii. And the word according to Encarta derives from Mid-19th century. < Fox wikiyapi... that sound a lot like wikiwikie no? --CyclePat 03:29, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

Check your geography. The Southwestern US is closer to the eastern US than it is to Hawaii. Also, the 19th century date is the result of late European contact. Superficial similarity between unrelated words in unrelated languages is quite common. It does not imply an etymological relationship. --EncycloPetey 03:39, 23 April 2007 (UTC)
Check your geography. The Southwestern US is closer to the eastern US than it is to Hawaii. Also, the 19th century date is the result of late European contact. Superficial similarity between unrelated words in unrelated languages is quite common. It does not imply an etymological relationship. --EncycloPetey 03:39, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

w:Southwestern US appears to refer to quite a few ambiguous places. The best thing I could find is a cached definition from google.[2] It says "f the arid regions of the west and southwest North America, such as Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Idaho, California, and northern Mexico." That's a pretty large area. Anyway... we know it was the Fox Indians and not the Algonquin. You may have meant the Algonquian, spelt with an "a". That may make more sense, because I think they're closer to Portland. According to answer.com "though wickiups were built by many different tribes, the word apparently comes from wiikiyaapi meaning "lodge" or "house" in the Sac and Fox or Mesquakie language. Sac and Fox, two dialects of the same language, belong to the Algonquian language family. Nowadays the language is spoken by about seven hundred members of the tribe in Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma."(http://www.answers.com/topic/wickiup) Answers indicates that this "hut" could be set up fairly quickly. With a large increase of sugar plantations, exports, in the 1860-70, westernization was occurring. According to answers.com, by 1890, the aboriginals of Hawaii "were not even a majority in their own land." By August 12 1898 Hawaii had the flag of the United States raised over Iolani Palace in Honolulu. Influence of missionaries was occuring. Distance or proximity to locations doesn't really have much to do with the issue of influence, specially when we are talking about having an ocean of water in between. Never the less... According to Hawaii fast Facts and Trivai, Hawaii is 2,390 miles from California.[3] California is considered part of Southwestern US. Los Angeles, California, CA, USA to Alabama (eastern US) is approx. 2,129 miles.[4]. I am fishing here,but you must admit the idea is entertaining... hut for native Americans... huts for Hawaiians. I bet you some Westerner brought the term to Hawaii. --CyclePat 04:57, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

However, I think you're forgetting something here. We don't do speculative etymologies on Wiktionary. Can you find a respectable reference for this possible cognate? If you can't, then it does not belong here, even if it is reasonable. Atelaes 00:01, 24 April 2007 (UTC)