Wiktionary:Webster 1913/138

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Page 138[edit]

bepuffed

Adjective[edit]

  1. Puffed; praised.

Carlyle.

bepurple

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To tinge or dye with a purple color.

bequeath

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: bequeathed
Present participle: bequeathing.]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>biquethen</ets>, AS. <ets>becwean</ets> to say, affirm, bequeath; pref. <ets>be-</ets> + <ets>cwean</ets> to say, speak. See Quoth.

  1. To give or leave by will; to give by testament; -- said especially of personal property.
    • My heritage, which my dead father did bequeath to me.

Shak.

  1. To hand down; to transmit.
    • To bequeath posterity somewhat to remember it.

Glanvill.

  1. To give; to offer; to commit. [Obs.]
    • To whom, with all submission, on my knee

I do bequeath my faithful services And true subjection everlastingly. Shak.

<syn>Syn. -- To bequeath, Devise.</syn> <usage>Both these words denote the giving or disposing of property by will. Devise, in legal usage, is property used to denote a gift by will of real property, and he to whom it is given is called the devisee. Bequeath is properly applied to a gift by will or legacy; <it>i. e.</it>, of personal property; the gift is called a legacy, and he who receives it is called a legatee. In popular usage the word bequeath is sometimes enlarged so as to embrace devise; and it is sometimes so construed by courts.</usage>

bequeathable

Adjective[edit]

  1. Capable of being bequeathed.

bequeathal

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of bequeathing; bequeathment; bequest.

Fuller.

bequeathment

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of bequeathing, or the state of being bequeathed; a bequest.

bequest

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>biquest</ets>, corrupted from <ets>bequide</ets>; pref. <ets>be-</ets> + AS. <ets>cwide</ets> a saying, <ets>becwean</ets> to bequeath. The ending <ets>-est</ets> is probably due to confusion with <ets>quest</ets>. See bequeath, Quest.

  1. The act of bequeathing or leaving by will; <as>as, a <ex>bequest</ex> of property by A</as>. to B.
  2. That which is left by will, esp. personal property; a legacy; also, a gift.

bequest

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To bequeath, or leave as a legacy. [Obs.] All I have to bequest."

Gascoigne.

bequethen

  1. old p. p. of bequeath. [Obs.]

Chaucer.

bequote

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To quote constantly or with great frequency.

berain

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: berained
Present participle: beraining.]

  1. To rain upon; to wet with rain. [Obs.]

Chaucer.

berate

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Berated;
Present participle: Berating.]

  1. To rate or chide vehemently; to scold. Holland. Motley.

berattle

(),

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To make rattle; to scold vociferously; to cry down. [Obs.] Shak.

beray

(?) v.t.

Etymology[edit]

Pref. be + ray to defile

  1. TO make foul; to soil; to defile.

[Obs.] Milton.

berbe

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. Berber, Barb a Barbary horse.

  1. (Zoöl.): An African genet (Genetta pardina). See Genet.

berber

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Barbary.

  1. A member of a race somewhat resembling the Arabs, but often classed as Hamitic, who were formerly the inhabitants of the whole of North Africa from the Mediterranean southward into the Sahara, and who still occupy a large part of that region; -- called also Kabyles. Also, the language spoken by this people.

berberine

Noun[edit]

  1. (Chem.): An alkaloid obtained, as a bitter, yellow substance, from the root of the barberry, gold thread, and other plants.

berberry

,

Noun[edit]

  1. See Barberry.

berdash

  1. ,

Noun[edit]

A kind of neckcloth. [Obs.]

    • A treatise against the cravat and berdash.

Steele.

bere

  1. ,

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. OIcel. <ets>berja</ets> to strike. To pierce. [Obs.] Chaucer.

bere

  1. ,

Noun[edit]

See Bear, barley. [Scot.]

bereave

(),

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: bereaved (), bereft ();
Present participle: <er>Bereaving.</er>]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>bireven</ets>, AS. <ets>bereáfian</ets>. See <er>Be-</er>, and <er>Reave.</er>

  1. To make destitute; to deprive; to strip; -- with of before the person or thing taken away.
    • Madam, you have bereft me of all words. Shak.
    • Bereft of him who taught me how to sing. Tickell.
  2. To take away from. [Obs.]
    • All your interest in those territories

Is utterly bereft you; all is lost. Shak.

  1. To take away. [Obs.]
    • Shall move you to bereave my life. Marlowe.

&hand; The imp. and past pple. form bereaved is not used in reference to immaterial objects. We say bereaved or bereft by death of a relative, bereft of hope and strength.

<syn>Syn. -- To dispossess; to divest.</syn>

bereavement

Noun[edit]

  1. The state of being bereaved; deprivation; esp., the loss of a relative by death.

bereaver

Noun[edit]

  1. One who bereaves.

bereft

Imperfect and past participle:

  1. of Bereave.

beretta

Noun[edit]

  1. Same as Berretta.

berg

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

&root;95. See Barrow hill, and cf. Iceberg.

  1. A large mass or hill, as of ice.
    • Glittering bergs of ice. Tennyson.

bergander

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Berg, for burrow + gander a male goose ? Cf. G. bergente, Dan. gravgaas.

  1. (Zoöl.): A European duck (<spn>Anas tadorna</spn>). See Sheldrake.

bergeret

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OF. bergerete, F. berger a shepherd.

  1. A pastoral song. [Obs.]

bergh

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. beorg.

  1. A hill. [Obs.]

bergmaster

Noun[edit]

  1. See Barmaster.

bergmeal

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

G. berg mountain + mehl meal.

  1. (Min.) An earthy substance, resembling fine flour. It is composed of the shells of infusoria, and in Lapland and Sweden is sometimes eaten, mixed with flour or ground birch bark, in times of scarcity. This name is also given to a white powdery variety of calcite.

bergmote

Noun[edit]

  1. See barmote.

bergomask

Noun[edit]

  1. A rustic dance, so called in ridicule of the people of Bergamo, in Italy, once noted for their clownishness.

bergylt

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Etymol. uncertain.

  1. (Zoöl.): The Norway haddock. See Rosefish.

berhyme

(),

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: Berhymed
Present participle: Berhyming.]

  1. To mention in rhyme or verse; to rhyme about. [Sometimes use depreciatively.] Shak.

beriberi

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Singhalese <ets>beri</ets> weakness.

  1. An acute disease occurring in India, characterized by multiple inflammatory changes in the nerves, producing great muscular debility, a painful rigidity of the limbs, and cachexy.

berime

(),

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To berhyme. [The earlier and etymologically preferable spelling.]

berkeleian

  1. ,

Adjective[edit]

Of or relating to Bishop Berkeley or his system of idealism; <as>as, Berkeleian philosophy</as>. -- <wf>Berke"ley*ism</wf>, n.

berlin

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The capital of Prussia

  1. A four-wheeled carriage, having a sheltered seat behind the body and separate from it, invented in the 17th century, at Berlin.
  2. Fine worsted for fancy-work; zephyr worsted; -- called also Berlin wool.

<cs><col>Berlin black</col>, <cd>a black varnish, drying with almost a dead surface; -- used for coating the better kinds of ironware.</cd> Ure. -- <col>Berlin blue</col>, <cd>Prussian blue.</cd> Ure. -- <col>Berlin green</col>, <cd>a complex cyanide of iron, used as a green dye, and similar to Prussian blue.</cd> -- <col>Berlin iron</col>, <cd>a very fusible variety of cast iron, from which figures and other delicate articles are manufactured. These are often stained or lacquered in imitation of bronze.</cd> -- <col>Berlin shop</col>, <cd>a shop for the sale of worsted embroidery and the materials for such work.</cd> -- <col>Berlin work</col>, <cd>worsted embroidery.</cd></cs>

berm Berme

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>berme</ets>, of German origin; cf. G. <ets>brame</ets>, <ets>bräme</ets>, border, akin to E. <ets>brim</ets>.

  1. (Fort.): A narrow shelf or path between the bottom of a parapet and the ditch.
  2. (Engineering): A ledge at the bottom of a bank or cutting, to catch earth that may roll down the slope, or to strengthen the bank.

bermuda grass

. #(Bot.): A kind of grass (<spn>Cynodon Dactylon</spn>) esteemed for pasture in the Southern United States. It is a native of Southern Europe, but is now wide-spread in warm countries; -- called also <altname>scutch grass</altname>, and in Bermuda, <altname>devil grass</altname>.

bernacle

Noun[edit]

  1. See barnacle.

berna fly

. #(Zoöl.): A Brazilian dipterous insect of the genus <spn>Trypeta</spn>, which lays its eggs in the nostrils or in wounds of man and beast, where the larvæ do great injury.

bernardine

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to St. Bernard of Clairvaux, or to the Cistercian monks. -- <def2>

Noun[edit]

  1. A Cistercian monk.</def2>

bernese

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to the city o canton of Bern, in Switzerland, or to its inhabitants. -- <def2>n. sing. & pl.
  2. A native or natives of Bern.</def2>

bernicle

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>bernak</ets>, <ets>bernacle</ets>; cf. OF. <ets>bernac</ets>; prob. from LL. <ets>bernacula</ets> for <ets>hibernicula</ets>, <ets>bernicula</ets>, from <ets>Hibernia</ets>; the birds coming from <ets>Hibernia</ets> or Ireland. Cf. 1st barnacle.

  1. A bernicle goose. <altsp>[Written also <asp>barnacle</asp>.]</altsp>

<cs><col>Bernicle goose</col> #(Zoöl.)</fld>, <cd>a goose (<spn>Branta leucopsis</spn>), of Arctic Europe and America. It was formerly believed that it hatched from the cirripeds of the sea (<spn>Lepas</spn>), which were, therefore, called barnacles, goose barnacles, or Anatifers. The name is also applied to other related species. See Anatifa and Cirripedia.</cd></cs>

bernouse

Noun[edit]

  1. Some as burnoose.

berob

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To rob; to plunder. [Obs.]

beroe

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>Beroe</ets>, one of the Oceanidæ Gr. <ets></ets>: cf. F. <ets>beroé</ets>.

  1. (Zoöl.): A small, oval, transparent jellyfish, belonging to the Ctenophora.

berretta

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

It., from LL. <ets>birrettum</ets>, <ets>berretum</ets>, a cap, dim. of L. <ets>birrus</ets>, <ets>birrum</ets>, a cloak to keep off rain, cf. Gr. <ets></ets> tawny, red: cf. Sp. <ets>birreta</ets>, Pg. <ets>barrete</ets>, and E. barret.

  1. A square cap worn by ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic Church. A cardinal's berretta is scarlet; that worn by other clerics is black, except that a bishop's is lined with green. <altsp>[Also spelt <asp>beretta</asp>, <asp>biretta</asp>, etc.]</altsp>

berried

Adjective[edit]

  1. Furnished with berries; consisting of a berry; baccate; <as>as, a <ex>berried</ex> shrub</as>.

berry

Noun[edit]

<plu>pl. <plw>Berries</plw>.</plu>

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>berie</ets>, AS. <ets>berie</ets>, <ets>berige</ets>; akin to D. <ets>bes</ets>, G. <ets>beere</ets>, OS. and OHG. <ets>beri</ets>, Icel. <ets>ber</ets>, Sw. <ets>bär</ets>, Goth. <ets>basi</ets>, and perh. Skr. <ets>bhas</ets> to eat.

  1. Any small fleshy fruit, as the strawberry, mulberry, huckleberry, etc.
  2. (Bot.): A small fruit that is pulpy or succulent throughout, having seeds loosely imbedded in the pulp, as the currant, grape, blueberry.
  3. The coffee bean.
  4. One of the ova or eggs of a fish.

Travis.

<cs><col>In berry</col>, <cd>containing ova or spawn.</cd></cs>

berry

Intransitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: berried
Present participle: berrying.]

  1. To bear or produce berries.

berry

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

AS. <ets>beorh</ets>. See barrow a hill.

  1. A mound; a hillock.

W. Browne.

berrying

Noun[edit]

  1. A seeking for or gathering of berries, esp. of such as grow wild.

berserk, Berserker

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Icel. <ets>berserkr</ets>.

  1. (Scand. Myth.): One of a class of legendary heroes, who fought frenzied by intoxicating liquors, and naked, regardless of wounds.

Longfellow.

  1. One who fights as if frenzied, like a Berserker.

berstle

Noun[edit]

  1. See bristle. [Obs.]

Chaucer.

berth

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the root of <ets>bear</ets> to produce, like <ets>birth</ets> nativity. See birth. <altsp>[Also written <asp>birth</asp>.]</altsp>

  1. (Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Convenient sea room. <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A room in which a number of the officers or ship's company mess and reside. <sd>(c)</sd> <def>The place where a ship lies when she is at anchor, or at a wharf.
  2. An allotted place; an appointment; situation or employment. He has a good berth."

Totten.

  1. A place in a ship to sleep in; a long box or shelf on the side of a cabin or stateroom, or of a railway car, for sleeping in.

<cs><col>Berth deck</col>, <cd>the deck next below the lower gun deck.</cd> Ham. Nav. Encyc. -- <mcol><col>To give</col> (the land or any object) <col>a wide berth</col></mcol>, <cd>to keep at a distance from it.</cd></cs>

berth

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle: berthed
Present participle: Berthing]].]

  1. To give an anchorage to, or a place to lie at; to place in a berth; <as>as, she was <ex>berthed</ex> stem to stern with the Adelaide</as>.
  2. To allot or furnish berths to, on shipboard; <as>as, to <ex>berth</ex> a ship's company</as>.

Totten.

bertha

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>berthe</ets>, from <ets>Berthe</ets>, a woman's name.

  1. A kind of collar or cape worn by ladies.

berthage

Noun[edit]

  1. A place for mooring vessels in a dock or harbor.

berthierite

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From <ets>Berthier</ets>, a French naturalist.

  1. (Min.): A double sulphide of antimony and iron, of a dark steel-gray color.

berthing

Noun[edit]

  1. (Naut.): The planking outside of a vessel, above the sheer strake.

Smyth.

bertram

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Corrupted from L. <ets>pyrethrum</ets>, Gr. <ets></ets> a hot spicy plant, from <ets></ets> fire.

  1. (Bot.): Pellitory of Spain (<spn>Anacyclus pyrethrum</spn>).