Wiktionary:Webster 1913/19

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Page 19[edit]

adact[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin adactus, past participle of adigere

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To compel; to drive. - Fotherby

adactyl, Adactylous[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Greek privative + finger

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy) Without fingers or without toes
  2. (Zoölogy) Without claws on the feet (of crustaceous animals)

adage[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French adage, from Latin adagium; ad + the root of Latin aio I say

Noun[edit]

  1. An old saying, which has obtained credit by long use; a proverb.
    Quotations
    • Letting “I dare not" wait upon “I would,"/ Like the poor cat i' the adage. - Shakespeare, Macbeth, I-vii

Synonyms[edit]

adagial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to an adage; proverbial, as in Adagial verse - Barrow

adagio[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Italian adagio; ad (Latin ad) at + agio convenience, leisure, ease. See agio

Adjective and Adverb[edit]

  1. (Music): Slow; slowly, leisurely, and gracefully. When repeated, adagio, adagio, it directs the movement to be very slow.

Noun[edit]

  1. A piece of music in adagio time; a slow movement; as, an adagio of Haydn.

adam[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

  1. The name given in the Bible to the first man, the progenitor of the human race.
  2. (As a symbol) Original sin; human frailty.
    Quotations
    • And whipped the offending Adam out of him. - Shakespeare, Henry V, I-i

Derived expressions[edit]

  • . Adam's ale, water. (colloquial)
  • Adam’s apple
    1. (Botany): A species of banana (Musa paradisiaca). It attains a height of twenty feet or more - Paxton
    2. (Botany): A species of lime (Citris limetta)
  1. The projection formed by the thyroid cartilage in the neck. It is particularly prominent in males, and is so called from a notion that it was caused by the forbidden fruit (an apple) sticking in the throat of our first parent
  • Adam's flannel, (Botany): the mullein (Verbascum thapsus)
  • Adam's needle, (Botany), the popular name of a genus (Yucca) of liliaceous plants.

adamant[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English adamaunt, adamant, diamond, magnet, Old French adamant, Latin adamas, adamantis, the hardest metal, from Greek privative + to tame, subdue. In Old English, from confusion with Latin adamare to love, be attached to, the word meant also magnet, as in Old French and Late Latin. See diamond, tame

Noun[edit]

  1. A stone imagined by some to be of impenetrable hardness; a name given to the diamond and other substance of extreme hardness; but in modern minerology it has no technical signification. It is now a rhetorical or poetical name for the embodiment of impenetrable hardness.
    Quotations
    • Opposed the rocky orb Of tenfold adamant, his ample shield. - Milton
  2. (Obsolete): Lodestone; magnet
    Quotations
    • A great adamant of acquaintance - Bacon
    • As true to thee as steel to adamant - Greene

adamantean[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin adamantēus

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of adamant; hard as adamant. - Milton

adamantine[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin adamantinus, Greek

Adjective[edit]

  1. Made of adamant, or having the qualities of adamant; incapable of being broken, dissolved, or penetrated; as, adamantine bonds or chains.
  2. (Mineralogy): Like the diamond in hardness or luster.

adambulacral[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin ad + English ambulacral

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): Next to the ambulacra; as, the adambulacral ossicles of the starfish.

adamic, Adamical[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to Adam, or resembling him. Adamic earth, a name given to common red clay, from a notion that Adam means red earth.

adamite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Adam

Noun[edit]

  1. A descendant of Adam; a human being.
  2. (Ecclesiastical History): One of a sect of visionaries, who, professing to imitate the state of Adam, discarded the use of dress in their assemblies.

adam's apple[edit]

  1. See under Adam

adance[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Dancing. - Lowell

adangle[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Dangling. - Browning

adansonia[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Adanson, a French botanist

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A genus of great trees related to the Bombax. There are two species, Adansonia digitata, the baobab or monkey-bread of Africa and India, and Adansonia gregorii , the sour gourd or cream-of-tartar tree of Australia. Both have a trunk of moderate height, but of enormous diameter, and a wide-spreading head. The fruit is oblong, and filled with pleasantly acid pulp. The wood is very soft, and the bark is used by the natives for making ropes and cloth. - D. C. Eaton

adapt[edit]

Latin adaptare; ad + aptare to fit; compare French adapter. See apt, adept

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Fitted; suited. - Swift

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: adapted
Present participle: adapting

  1. To make suitable; to fit, or suit; to adjust; to alter so as to fit for a new use; -- sometimes followed by to or for.
    Quotations
    • For nature, always in the right, To your decays adapts my sight. - Swift
    • Appeals adapted to his [man's] whole nature. - Angus
    • Streets ill adapted for the residence of wealthy persons. - Macaulay

adaptability, Adaptableness[edit]

Noun[edit]

The quality of being adaptable; suitableness.

  1. Quotations
    • General adaptability for every purpose. - Farrar

adaptable[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Capable of being adapted.

adaptation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare French adaptation, Late Latin adaptatio

Noun[edit]

  1. The act or process of adapting, or fitting; or the state of being adapted or fitted; fitness.
    Quotations
    • Adaptation of the means to the end. - Erskine
  2. The result of adapting; an adapted form.

adaptative[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Adaptive - Stubbs

adaptedness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The state or quality of being adapted; suitableness; special fitness.

adapter[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who adapts.
  2. (Chemistry): A connecting tube; an adopter
  3. Any device connecting two parts of an apparatus (e.g. tubes of different diameters, or electric cords with different plug types); a device allowing an apparatus to be used for purposes other than originally intended

adaption[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Adaptation. - Cheyne

adaptive[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Suited, given, or tending, to adaptation; characterized by adaptation; capable of adapting. - Coleridge

==adaptively

Adverb[edit]

  1. In an adaptive manner

adaptiveness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The quality of being adaptive; capacity to adapt.

adaptly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Rare): In a suitable manner. - Prior

adaptness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Rare): Adaptedness

adaptorial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Rare): Adaptive

adar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Hebrew adär

Noun[edit]

  1. The twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical year, and the sixth of the civil. It corresponded nearly with March.

adarce[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin adarce, adarca, Greek

Noun[edit]

  1. A saltish concretion on reeds and grass in marshy grounds in Galatia. It is soft and porous, and was formerly used for cleansing the skin from freckles and tetters, and also in leprosy. - Dana

adatis[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A fine cotton cloth of India.

adaunt[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English adaunten to overpower, Old French adonter; à (Latin ad) + donter, French dompter See daunt

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To daunt; to subdue; to mitigate. - Skelton

adaw[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old English adawe of dawe, Anglo Saxon of dagum from days, i.e., from life, out of life

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To subdue; to daunt
    Quotations
    • The sight whereof did greatly him adaw. - Spenser

adaw[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English adawen to wake; prefix a- (compare Gothic us-, German er-) + dawen, dagon, to dawn. See daw

Transitive and intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To awaken; to arouse
    Quotations
    • A man that waketh of his sleep He may not suddenly well taken keep Upon a thing, ne seen it parfitly Till that he be adawed verily. - Chaucer

adays[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Prefix a- (for on) + day; the final s was originally a genitive ending, afterwards forming adverbs

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): By day, or every day; in the daytime. - Fielding

ad captandum[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin, for catching

Adjectival phrase[edit]

  1. Relating to meretricious attempts to catch or win popular favor.