Wiktionary:Webster 1913/370

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Page 370

Dateless

Adjective

  1. Without date; having no fixed time.

Datum

Noun

<plu>pl. <plw>Data</plw> (#)</plu>.

Etymology

L. See 2d Date.]

  1. Something given or admitted; a fact or principle granted; that upon which an inference or an argument is based; -- used chiefly in the plural.
    Quotations
    • Any writer, therefore, who . . . furnishes us with data sufficient to determine the time in which he wrote.

Priestley]]

1. <pluf>pl.</pluf>

  1. (Math.): The quantities or relations which are assumed to be given in any problem.

<cs><col>Datum line</col>

  1. (Surv.)</fld>, <cd>the horizontal or base line, from which the heights of points are reckoned or measured, as in the plan of a railway, etc.</cd></cs>

Datura

Noun

Etymology

NL.; cf. Skr. <ets>dhattra</ets>, Per. & Ar. <ets>tatra</ets>, <ets>Tatla</ets>.]

  1. (Bot.): A genus of solanaceous plants, with large funnel-shaped flowers and a four-celled, capsular fruit.

The commonest species are the thorn apple (<spn>D. stramonium</spn>), with a prickly capsule (see Illust. of capsule), white flowers and green stem, and <spn>D. tatula</spn>, with a purplish tinge of the stem and flowers. Both are narcotic and dangerously poisonous.

Daturine

Noun

Etymology

From Datura.]

  1. (Chem.): Atropine; -- called also <altname>daturia</altname> and <altname>daturina</altname>.

Daub

Transitive verb

<wordforms>[imperfect and past participleDaubed present participle Daubing.]</wordforms> 

Etymology

OE. <ets>dauben</ets> to smear, OF. <ets>dauber</ets> to plaster, fr. L. <ets>dealbare</ets> to whitewash, plaster; <ets>de-</ets> + <ets>albare</ets> to whiten, fr. <ets>albus</ets> white, perh. also confused with W. <ets>dwb</ets> plaster, <ets>dwbio</ets> to plaster, Ir. & OGael. <ets>dob</ets> plaster. See Alb, and cf. Dealbate.]

  1. To smear with soft, adhesive matter, as pitch, slime, mud, etc.; to plaster; to bedaub; to besmear.
    Quotations
    • She took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch.

Ex. ii. 3]]

  1. To paint in a coarse or unskillful manner.
    Quotations
    • If a picture is daubed with many bright and glaring colors, the vulgar admire it is an excellent piece.

I. Watts]]

  1. Quotations
    • A lame, imperfect piece, rudely daubed over.

Dryden]]

  1. To cover with a specious or deceitful exterior; to disguise; to conceal.
    Quotations
    • So smooth he daubed his vice with show of virtue.

Shak]]

  1. To flatter excessively or glossy.

(Rare):

  1. Quotations
    • I can safely say, however, that, without any daubing at all,

I am very sincerely your very affectionate, humble servant. Smollett]]

  1. To put on without taste; to deck gaudily.

(Rare):

  1. Quotations
    • Let him be daubed with lace.

Dryden]]

Daub

Intransitive verb

  1. To smear; to play the flatterer.
    Quotations
    • His conscience . . . will not daub nor flatter.

South]]

Daub

Noun

  1. A viscous, sticky application; a spot smeared or dabed; a smear.
  2. (Paint.): A picture coarsely executed.
    Quotations
    • Did you . . . take a look at the grand picture? . . . 'T is a melancholy daub, my lord.

Sterne]]

Dauber

Noun

  1. One who, or that which, daubs; especially, a coarse, unskillful painter.
  2. (Copperplate Print.): A pad or ball of rags, covered over with canvas, for inking plates; a dabber.
  3. A low and gross flattere.
  4. (Zoöl.): The mud wasp; the mud dauber.

Daubery, ∨ Daubry

∨ <hw>,

Noun

  1. A daubing; specious coloring; false pretenses.
    Quotations
    • She works by charms, by spells, by the figure, and such daubery as this is.

Shak]]

Daubing

Noun

  1. The act of one who daubs; that which is daubed.
  2. A rough coat of mortar put upon a wall to give it the appearance of stone; rough-cast.
  3. In currying, a mixture of fish oil and tallow worked into leather; -- called also <altname>dubbing</altname>.

Knight.

Daubreelite

Noun

Etymology

From <ets>Daubrée</ets>, a French mineralogist.]

  1. (Min.): A sulphide of chromium observed in some meteoric irons.

Dauby

Adjective

  1. Smeary; viscous; glutinous; adhesive.

Dauby wax."

Daughter

Noun

<plu>pl. <plw>Daughters</plw> (#); obs. pl. <plw>Daughtren</plw> (#).</plu>

Etymology

OE. <ets>doughter</ets>, <ets>doghter</ets>, <ets>dohter</ets>, AS. <ets>dohtor</ets>, <ets>dohter</ets>; akin to OS. <ets>dohtar</ets>, D. <ets>dochter</ets>, G. <ets>tochter</ets>, Icel. <ets>dtir</ets>, Sw. <ets>dotter</ets>, Dan. <ets>dotter</ets>, <ets>datter</ets>, Goth. <ets>da\'a3htar</ets>,, OSlav. <ets>dshti</ets>, Russ. <ets>doche</ets>, Lith. <ets>dukt</ets>, Gr. <ets></ets>, Zen. <ets>dughdhar</ets>, Skr. <ets>duhit</ets>; possibly originally, the milker, cf. Skr. <ets>duh</ets> to milk. &root;68, 245.]

  1. The female offspring of the human species; a female child of any age; -- applied also to the lower animals.
  2. A female descendant; a woman.
    Quotations
    • This woman, being a daughter of Abraham.

Luke xiii. 16]]

  1. Quotations
    • Dinah, the daughter of Leah, which she bare unto Jacob, went out to see the daughter of the land.

Gen. xxxiv. 1]]

  1. A son's wife; a daughter-in-law.
    Quotations
    • And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters.

Ruth. i. 11]]

  1. A term of adress indicating parental interest.
    Quotations
    • Daughter, be of good comfort.

Matt. ix. 22]]

<cs><col>Daughter cell</col>

  1. (Biol.)</fld>, <cd>one of the cells formed by cell division. See <cref>Cell division</cref>, under Division.</cd></cs>

Daughter-in-law

n.; <plu>pl. <plw>Daughters-in-law</plw>.</plu> The wife of one's son.

Daughterliness

Noun

  1. The state of a daughter, or the conduct becoming a daughter.

Daughterly

Adjective

  1. Becoming a daughter; filial.
    Quotations
    • Sir Thomas liked her natural and dear daughterly affection towards him.

Cavendish]]

Dauk

Transitive verb

  1. See Dawk, v. t., to cut or gush.

Daun

Noun

  1. A variant of Dan, a title of honor.

(Obsolete):

Chaucer.

Daunt

Transitive verb

<wordforms>[imperfect and past participleDaunted; present participle Daunting.]</wordforms> 

Etymology

OF. <ets>danter</ets>, F. <ets>dompter</ets> to tame, subdue, fr. L. <ets>domitare</ets>, v. intens. of <ets>domare</ets> to tame. See Tame.]

  1. To overcome; to conquer.

(Obsolete):

  1. To repress or subdue the courage of; to check by fear of danger; to cow; to intimidate; to dishearten.
    Quotations
    • Some presences daunt and discourage us.

Glanvill]]

<syn>Syn. -- To dismay; appall. See Dismay.</syn>

Daunter

Noun

  1. One who daunts.

Dauntless

Adjective

  1. Incapable of being daunted; undaunted; bold; fearless; intrepid.
    Quotations
    • Dauntless he rose, and to the fight returned.

Dryden]]

-- <wordforms><wf>Daunt"less*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Daunt"less*ness</wf>,

Noun

</wordforms>

Dauphin

Noun

Etymology

F. <ets>dauphin</ets>, prop., a dolphin, from L. <ets>delphinus</ets>. See Dolphin. The name was given, for some reason unexplained, to Guigo, count of Vienne, in the 12th century, and was borne by succeeding counts of Vienne. In 1349, Dauphiny was bequeathed to Philippe de Valois, king of France, on condition that the heir of the crown should always hold the title of <ets>Dauphin</ets> de Viennois.]

  1. The title of the eldest son of the king of France, and heir to the crown. Since the revolution of 1830, the title has been discontinued.

Dauphiness, ∨ Dauphine

∨ <hw>,

Noun

  1. The title of the wife of the dauphin.

Dauw

Noun

Etymology

D.]

  1. (Zoöl.): The striped quagga, or Burchell's zebra, of South Africa (<spn>Asinus Burchellii</spn>); -- called also <altname>peechi</altname>, or <altname>peetsi</altname>.

Davenport

Noun

Etymology

From the name of the original maker. Encyc. Dict.]

  1. A kind of small writing table, generally somewhat ornamental, and forming a piece of furniture for the parlor or boudoir.
    Quotations
    • A much battered davenport in one of the windows, at which sat a lady writing.

A. B. Edwards]]

Davidic

Adjective

  1. Of or pertaining to David, the king and psalmist of Israel, or to his family.

Davit

Noun

Etymology

Cf. F. <ets>davier</ets> forceps, davit, cooper's instrument, G. <ets>david</ets> davit; all probably from the proper name <ets>David</ets>.]

  1. (Naut.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd>
  2. A spar formerly used on board of ships, as a crane to hoist the flukes of the anchor to the top of the bow, without injuring the sides of the ship; -- called also the <altname>fish davit</altname>.

<sd>(b)</sd> <pluf>pl.</pluf>

  1. Curved arms of timber or iron, projecting over a ship's side of stern, having tackle to raise or lower a boat, swing it in on deck, rig it out for lowering, etc.; -- called also <altname>boat davits</altname>.

Totten.

Davy Jones

.

  1. The spirit of the sea; sea devil; -- a term used by sailors.
    Quotations
    • This same Davy Jones, according to the mythology of sailors, is the fiend that presides over all the evil spirits of the deep, and is seen in various shapes warning the devoted wretch of death and woe.

Smollett]]

<cs><col>Davy Jones's Locker</col>, <cd>the ocean, or bottom of the ocean.</cd> -- <col>Gone to Davy Jones's Locker</col>, <cd>dead, and buried in the sea; thrown overboard.</cd></cs>

Davy lamp

  1. See <cref>Safety lamp</cref>, under Lamp.

Davyne

Noun

Etymology

See Davyum.]

  1. (Min.): A variety of nephelite from Vesuvius.

Davyum

Noun

Etymology

Named after Sir Humphry <ets>Davy</ets>, the English chemist.]

  1. (Chem.): A rare metallic element found in platinum ore. It is a white malleable substance. Symbol Da. Atomic weight 154.

<-- ? Europium is 152(the closest)? -->

Daw

Noun

Etymology

OE. <ets>dawe</ets>; akin to OHG. <ets>t&amacr;ha</ets>, MHG. <ets>t&amacr;he</ets>, <ets>t&amacr;hele</ets>, G. <ets>dohle</ets>. Cf. Caddow.]

  1. (Zoöl.): A European bird of the Crow family (<spn>Corvus monedula</spn>), often nesting in church towers and ruins; a jackdaw.
    Quotations
    • The loud daw, his throat

displaying, draw The whole assembly of his fellow daws. Waller]]

The daw was reckoned as a silly bird, and a daw meant a simpleton. See in Shakespeare: -- Then thou dwellest with daws too." (Coriolanus iv. 5, 1. 47.) Skeat.

Daw

Intransitive verb

Etymology

OE. <ets>dawen</ets>. See Dawn.]

  1. To dawn. (Obsolete): See Dawn.

Daw

Transitive verb

Etymology

Contr. fr. Adaw.]

  1. To rouse.

(Obsolete):

  1. To daunt; to terrify.

(Obsolete):

B. Jonson.

Dawdle

Intransitive verb

<wordforms>[imperfect and past participleDawdled present participle Dawdling .]</wordforms> 

Etymology

Cf. Daddle.]

  1. To waste time in trifling employment; to trifle; to saunter.
    Quotations
    • Come some evening and dawdle over a dish of tea with me.

Johnson]]

  1. Quotations
    • We . . . dawdle up and down Pall Mall.

Thackeray]]

Dawdle

Transitive verb

  1. To waste by trifling; <as>as, to <ex>dawdle</ex> away a whole morning</as>.

Dawdle

Noun

  1. A dawdler.

Colman & Carrick.

Dawdler

Noun

  1. One who wastes time in trifling employments; an idler; a trifler.

Dawe

Noun

Etymology

See Day.]

  1. Day.

(Obsolete):

Chaucer.

Dawish

Adjective

  1. Like a daw.

Dawk

Noun

  1. See Dak.

Dawk

Transitive verb

Etymology

Prov. E. <ets>dauk</ets> to cut or pierce with a jerk; cf. OE. <ets>dalk</ets> a dimple. Cf. Ir. <ets>tolch</ets>, <ets>tollachd</ets>, <ets>tolladh</ets>, a hole, crevice, <ets>toll</ets> to bore, pierce, W. <ets>tyllu</ets>.]

  1. To cut or mark with an incision; to gash.

Moxon.

Dawk

Noun

  1. A hollow, crack, or cut, in timber.

Moxon.

Dawn

Intransitive verb

<wordforms>[imperfect and past participleDawned present participle Dawning.]</wordforms> 

Etymology

OE. <ets>dawnen</ets>, <ets>dawen</ets>, <ets>dagen</ets>, <ets>daien</ets>, AS. <ets>dagian</ets> to become day, to dawn, fr. <ets>dæg</ets> day; akin to D. <ets>dagen</ets>, G. <ets>tagen</ets>, Icel. <ets>daga</ets>, Dan. <ets>dages</ets>, Sw. <ets>dagas</ets>. See Day. 71.]

  1. To begin to grow light in the morning; to grow light; to break, or begin to appear; <as>as, the day <ex>dawns</ex>; the morning <ex>dawns</ex>.</as>
    Quotations
    • In the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene . . . to see the sepulcher.

Matt. xxviii. 1]]

  1. To began to give promise; to begin to appear or to expand.

In dawning youth."

Dryden.

  1. Quotations
    • When life awakes, and dawns at every line.

Pope]]

  1. Quotations
    • Dawn on our darkness and lend us thine aid.

Heber,

Dawn

Noun

  1. The break of day; the first appeareance of light in the morning; show of approaching sunrise.
    Quotations
    • And oft at dawn, deep noon, or falling eve.

Thomson]]

  1. Quotations
    • No sun, no moon, no morn, no noon,

No dawn, no dusk, no proper time of day. Hood]]

  1. First opening or expansion; first appearance; beginning; rise.

The dawn of time."

Thomson.

  1. Quotations
    • These tender circumstances diffuse a dawn of serenity over the soul.

Pope]]

Dawsonite

Noun

Etymology

Named after J. W. <ets>Dawson</ets> of Montreal.]

  1. (Min.): A hydrous carbonate of alumina and soda, occuring in white, bladed crustals.

Day

Noun

Etymology

OE. <ets>day</ets>, <ets>dai</ets>,, <ets>dei</ets>, AS. <ets>dæg</ets>; akin to OS., D., Dan., & Sw. <ets>dag</ets>, G, <ets>tag</ets>, Icel. <ets>dagr</ets>, Goth. <ets>dags</ets>; cf. Skr. <ets>dah</ets> (for <ets>dhagh</ets> ?) to burn. √69. Cf. Dawn.]

  1. The time of light, or interval between one night and the next; the time between sunrise and sunset, or from dawn to darkness; hence, the light; sunshine.
  2. The period of the earth's revolution on its axis. -- ordinarily divided into twenty-four hours. It is measured by the interval between two successive transits of a celestial body over the same meridian, and takes a specific name from that of the body. Thus, if this is the sun, the day (the interval between two successive transits of the sun's center over the same meridian) is called a <stype>solar day</stype>; if it is a star, a <stype>sidereal day</stype>; if it is the moon, a <stype>lunar day</stype>. See <cref>Civil day</cref>, <cref>Sidereal day</cref>, below.
  3. Those hours, or the daily recurring period, allotted by usage or law for work.
  4. A specified time or period; time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; time.
    Quotations
    • A man who was great among the Hellenes of his day.

Jowett (Thucyd. )

  1. Quotations
    • If my debtors do not keep their day, . . .

I must with patience all the terms attend. Dryden]]

  1. (Preceded by the) Some day in particular, as some day of contest, some anniversary, etc.
    Quotations
    • The field of Agincourt,

Fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus. Shak]]

  1. Quotations
    • His name struck fear, his conduct won the day.

Roscommon]]

Day is much used in self-explaining compounds; as, daybreak, daylight, workday, etc.