Wiktionary:Webster 1913/727

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Page 727

Ignify

Transitive verb

<wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Ignified ; p. pr. & vb. n. Ignifying .]</wordforms> <ety>[L. <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>-fy</ets>.
  1. To form into fire.</def> [R.]

Stukeley.

Ignigenous

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignigenus</ets>; <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>genere</ets>, <ets>ginere</ets>, to beget, produce.

  1. Produced by the action of fire, as lava.</def> [R.]

Ignipotence

Noun

  1. Power over fire.</def> [R.]

Ignipotent

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignipotens</ets>; <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>potens</ets> powerful.

  1. Presiding over fire; also, fiery.

Vulcan is called the powerful ignipotent. Pope.

Ignis fatuus

<plu>pl. <plw>Ignes fatui</plw> (#)</plu>. <ety>[L. <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>fatuus</ets> foolish. So called in allusion to its tendency to mislead travelers.
  1. A phosphorescent light that appears, in the night, over marshy ground, supposed to be occasioned by the decomposition of animal or vegetable substances, or by some inflammable gas; -- popularly called also <altname>Will-with-the-wisp</altname>, or <altname>Will-o'-the-wisp</altname>, and <altname>Jack-with-a-lantern</altname>, or <altname>Jack-o'-lantern</altname>.</def><-- thought to be caused by phosphine, PH3, a sponaneously combustible gas. -->
  1. Fig.: A misleading influence; a decoy.

Scared and guided by the ignis fatuus of popular superstition. Jer. Taylor.

Ignite

Transitive verb

<wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Ignited ; p. pr. & vb. n. Igniting.]</wordforms> <ety>[L. <ets>ignitus</ets>, p.p. of <ets>ignire</ets> to ignite, fr. <ets>ignis</ets> fire. See Igneous.
  1. To kindle or set on fire; <as>as, to <ex>ignite</ex> paper or wood</as>.
  1. (Chem.): To subject to the action of intense heat; to heat strongly; -- often said of incombustible or infusible substances; <as>as, to <ex>ignite</ex> iron or platinum</as>.

Ignite

Intransitive verb

<def>To take fire; to begin to burn.

Ignitible

Adjective

  1. Capable of being ignited.

Ignition

Noun

Etymology

Cf. F. <ets>ignition</ets>.

  1. The act of igniting, kindling, or setting on fire.
  1. The state of being ignited or kindled.

Sir T. Browne.

Ignitor

Noun

  1. One who, or that which, produces ignition; especially, a contrivance for igniting the powder in a torpedo or the like.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>igniter</asp>.]</altsp>

Ignivomous

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignivomus</ets>; <ets>ignis</ets> fire + <ets>vomere</ets> 8vomit.

  1. Vomiting fire.</def> [R.]

Ignobility

Noun

Etymology

L. <ets>ignobilitas</ets>: cf. F. <ets>ignobilité</ets>.

  1. Ignobleness.</def> (Obsolete):

Bale.

Ignoble

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignobilis</ets>; pref. <ets>in-</ets> not + <ets>nobilis</ets> noble: cf. F. <ets>ignoble</ets>. See <er>In-</er> not, and Noble, a.

  1. Of low birth or family; not noble; not illustrious; plebeian; common; humble.

I was not ignoble of descent. Shak.

Her royal stock graft with ignoble plants. Shak.

  1. Not honorable, elevated, or generous; base.

'T but a base, ignoble mind,

That mounts no higher than a bird can soar.

Shak.

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife. Gray.

  1. (Zoölogy): Not a true or noble falcon; -- said of certain hawks, as the goshawk.

<syn>Syn. -- Degenerate; degraded; mean; base; dishonorable; reproachful; disgraceful; shameful; scandalous; infamous.</syn>

Ignoble

Transitive verb

<def>To make ignoble.</def> (Obsolete):

Bacon.

Ignobleness

Noun

  1. State or quality of being ignoble.

Ignobly

adv. <def>In an ignoble manner; basely.

Ignominious

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignominiosus</ets>: cf. F. <ets>ignominieux</ets>.

  1. Marked with ignominy; in curring public disgrace; dishonorable; shameful.

Then first with fear surprised and sense of pain,

Fled ignominious.

Milton.
  1. Deserving ignominy; despicable.

One single, obscure, ignominious projector. Swift.

  1. Humiliating; degrading; <as>as, an <ex>ignominious</ex> judgment or sentence</as>.

Macaulay.

Ignominiously

adv. <def>In an ignominious manner; disgracefully; shamefully; ingloriously.

Ignominy

Noun

<plu>pl. <plw>Ignominies</plw> (#)</plu>. <ety>[L. <ets>ignominia</ets> ignominy (<ets>i</ets>.<ets>e</ets>., a deprivation of one's good name); <ets>in-</ets> not + <ets>nomen</ets> name: cf. F. <ets>ignominie</ets>. See <er>In-</er> not, and Name.
  1. Public disgrace or dishonor; reproach; infamy.

Their generals have been received with honor after their defeat; yours with ignominy after conquest. Addison.

Vice begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. Rambler.

Ignominy is the infliction of such evil as is made dishonorable, or the deprivation of such good as is made honorable by the Common wealth. Hobbes.

  1. An act deserving disgrace; an infamous act.

<syn>Syn. -- Opprobrium; reproach; dishonor.</syn>

Ignomy

Noun

  1. Ignominy.</def> [R. & Obs.]

I blush to think upon this ignomy. Shak.

Ignoramus

Noun

Etymology

L., we are ignorant. See Ignore.

  1. (Law): We are ignorant; we ignore; -- being the word formerly written on a bill of indictment by a grand jury when there was not sufficient evidence to warrant them in finding it a true bill. The phrase now used is, No bill," No true bill," or Not found," though in some jurisdictions Ignored" is still used.

Wharton (Law Dict. ). Burn.

1. <plu>(pl. <plw>Ignoramuses</plw> ().)</plu> <def>A stupid, ignorant person; a vain pretender to knowledge; a dunce.

An ignoramus in place and power. South.

Ignorance

Noun

Etymology

F., fr. L. <ets>ignorantia</ets>.

  1. The condition of being ignorant; the want of knowledge in general, or in relation to a particular subject; the state of being uneducated or uninformed.

Ignorance is the curse of God,

Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

Shak.
  1. (Theol.): A willful neglect or refusal to acquire knowledge which one may acquire and it is his duty to have.

Book of Common Prayer.

<cs><col>Invincible ignorance</col> <fld>(Theol.)</fld>, <cd>ignorance beyond the individual's control and for which, therefore, he is not responsible before God.</cd></cs>

Ignorant

Adjective

Etymology

F., fr. L. <ets>ignorans</ets>, <ets>-antis</ets>, p.pr. of <ets>ignorare</ets> to be ignorant. See Ignore.

  1. Destitute of knowledge; uninstructed or uninformed; untaught; unenlightened.

He that doth not know those things which are of use for him to know, is but an ignorant man, whatever he may know besides. Tillotson.

  1. Unacquainted with; unconscious or unaware; -- used with of.

Ignorant of guilt, I fear not shame. Dryden.

  1. Unknown; undiscovered.</def> (Obsolete):

Ignorant concealment. Shak.

Alas, what ignorant sin have I committed? Shak.

  1. Resulting from ignorance; foolish; silly.

His shipping,

Poor ignorant baubles! -- on our terrible seas, Like eggshells moved.

Shak.

<syn>Syn. -- Uninstructed; untaught; unenlightened; uninformed; unlearned; unlettered; illiterate. -- Ignorant, Illiterate. Ignorant denotes want of knowledge, either as to single subject or information in general; illiterate refers to an ignorance of letters, or of knowledge acquired by reading and study. In the Middle Ages, a great proportion of the higher classes were illiterate, and yet were far from being ignorant, especially in regard to war and other active pursuits.</syn>

In such business

Action is eloquence, and the eyes of the ignorant More learned than the ears.

Shak.

In the first ages of Christianity, not only the learned and the wise, but the ignorant and illiterate, embraced torments and death. Tillotson.

Ignorant

Noun

  1. A person untaught or uninformed; one unlettered or unskilled; an ignoramous.

Did I for this take pains to teach

Our zealous ignorants to preach?

Denham.

Ignorantism

Noun

  1. The spirit of those who extol the advantage to ignorance; obscuriantism.

Ignorantist

Noun

  1. One opposed to the diffusion of knowledge; an obscuriantist.

Ignorantly

adv. <def>In a ignorant manner; without knowledge; inadvertently.

Whom therefoer ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you. Acts xvii. 23.

Ignore

Transitive verb

<wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Ignored ; p. pr. & vb. n. Ignoring.]</wordforms> <ety>[L. <ets>ignorare</ets>; pref. <ets>in-</ets> not + the root of <ets>gnarus</ets> knowing, <ets>noscere</ets> to become acquainted with. See Know, and cf. Narrate.
  1. To be ignorant of or not acquainted with.</def> [Archaic]

Philosophy would solidly be established, if men would more carefully distinguish those things that they know from those that they ignore. Boyle.

  1. (Law): To throw out or reject as false or ungrounded; -- said of a bill rejected by a grand jury for want of evidence. See Ignoramus.
  1. Hence: To refuse to take notice of; to shut the eyes to; not to recognize; to disregard willfully and causelessly; <as>as, to <ex>ignore</ex> certain facts; to <ex>ignore</ex> the presence of an objectionable person.</as>

Ignoring Italy under our feet,

And seeing things before, behind.

Mrs. Browning.

Ignoscible

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignoscibilis</ets>, fr. <ets>ignoscere</ets> to pardon, lit., not to wish to know; pref. <ets>in-</ets> not + <ets>gnoscere</ets>, <ets>noscere</ets>, to learn to know. See <er>In-</er> not, and Know.

  1. Pardonable.</def> (Obsolete):

Bailey.

Ignote

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ignotus</ets>; pref. <ets>in-</ets> not + <ets>gnotus</ets>, <ets>notus</ets>, known, p.p. of <ets>gnocere</ets>, <ets>nocere</ets>, to learn to know.

  1. Unknown.</def> (Obsolete): Sir E. Sandys. -- <def2>n. <def>One who is unknown.</def> Bp. Hacket.</def2>

Iguana

Noun

Etymology

Sp. <ets>iguana</ets>, from the native name in Hayti. Cf. Guana.

  1. (Zoölogy): Any species of the genus <spn>Iguana</spn>, a genus of large American lizards of the family <spn>Iguanidæ</spn>. They are arboreal in their habits, usually green in color, and feed chiefly upon fruits.

&hand; The common iguana (<spn>I. tuberculata</spn>) of the West Indies and South America is sometimes five feet long. Its flesh is highly prized as food. The horned iguana (<spn>I. cornuta</spn>) has a conical horn between the eyes.

Iguanian

Adjective

  1. (Zoölogy): Resembling, or pertaining to, the iguana.

Iguanid

Adjective

  1. (Zoölogy): Same as Iguanoid.

Iguanodon

Noun

Etymology

<ets>Iguana</ets> + Gr. , , a tooth.

  1. (Paleon.): A genus of gigantic herbivorous dinosaurs having a birdlike pelvis and large hind legs with three-toed feet capable of supporting the entire body. Its teeth resemble those of the iguana, whence its name. Several species are known, mostly from the Wealden of England and Europe. See Illustration in Appendix.

Iguanodont

Adjective

  1. (Paleon.): Like or pertaining to the genus Iguanodon.

Iguanoid

Adjective

Etymology

<ets>Iguana</ets> + -<ets>oid</ets>.

  1. (Zoölogy): Pertaining to the <spn>Iguanidæ</spn>.

Ihlang-ihlang

Noun

Etymology

Malayan, flower of flowers.

  1. A rich, powerful, perfume, obtained from the volatile oil of the flowers of <spn>Canada odorata</spn>, an East Indian tree.</def> <altsp>[Also written <asp>ylang-ylang</asp>.]</altsp>

Ihram

Noun

  1. The peculiar dress worn by pilgrims to Mecca.


Ileocæcal

Adjective

Etymology

<ets>Ileum</ets> + <ets>cæcal</ets>.

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to the ileum and cæcum.

Ileocolic

Adjective

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to the ileum and colon; <as>as, the <ex>ileocolic</ex>, or ileocæcal, valve, a valve where the ileum opens into the large intestine</as>.

Ileum

Noun

Etymology

L. <ets>ile</ets>, <ets>ileum</ets>, <ets>ilium</ets>, pl. <ets>ilia</ets>, groin, flank.

  1. (Anat.): The last, and usually the longest, division of the small intestine; the part between the jejunum and large intestine.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>ileon</asp>, and <asp>ilium</asp>.]</altsp>
  1. (Anat.): See Ilium.</def> [R.]

&hand; Most modern writers restrict ileum to the division of the intestine and ilium to the pelvic bone.

Ileus

Noun

Etymology

NL., fr. Gr. , , fr. to roll up.

  1. (Med.): A morbid condition due to intestinal obstruction. It is characterized by complete constipation, with griping pains in the abdomen, which is greatly distended, and in the later stages by vomiting of fecal matter. Called also <altname>ileac, ∨ iliac, passion</altname>.

Ilex

Noun

Etymology

L., holm oak.

  1. (Bot.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>The holm oak (<spn>Quercus Ilex</spn>).</def> <sd>(b)</sd> <def>A genus of evergreen trees and shrubs, including the common holly.

Iliac

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>Iliacus</ets>, Gr. . See Iliad.

  1. Pertaining to ancient Ilium, or Troy.

Gladstone.

Iliac

Adjective

Etymology

Cf. F. <ets>iliaque</ets>. See Ileum, and cf. Jade a stone.

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to, or in the region of, the ilium, or dorsal bone of the pelvis; <as>as, the <ex>iliac</ex> artery</as>.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>ileac</asp>.]</altsp>
  1. See Ileac, 1.</def> [R.]

<cs><col>Iliac crest</col>, <cd>the upper margin of the ilium.</cd> -- <col>Iliac passion</col>. <cd>See Ileus.</cd> -- <col>Iliac region</col>, <cd>a region of the abdomen, on either side of the hypogastric regions, and below the lumbar regions.</cd></cs>

Iliacal

Adjective

  1. Iliac.</def> [R.]

liad

Noun

Etymology

L. <ets>Ilias</ets>, <ets>-adis</ets>, Gr. , (sc. ), fr. , , Ilium, the city of Ilus, a son of Tros, founder of Ilium, which is a poetical name of Troy.

  1. A celebrated Greek epic poem, in twenty-four books, on the destruction of Ilium, the ancient Troy. The Iliad is ascribed to Homer.

Ilial

Adjective

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to the ilium; iliac.

Iliche

adv. <ety>[OE., fr. AS. <ets>gel&imacr;c</ets>. Cf. Alike.

  1. Alike.</def> (Obsolete):

Chaucer.

Ilicic

Adjective

Etymology

L. <ets>ilex</ets>, <ets>ilicis</ets>, holm oak.

  1. Pertaining to, or derived from, the holly (<spn>Ilex</spn>), and allied plants; <as>as, <ex>ilicic</ex> acid</as>.

Ilicin

Noun

  1. (Chem.): The bitter principle of the holly.

Ilio-

Etymology

From Ilium.

  1. A combining form used in anatomy to denote connection with, or relation to, the ilium; <as>as, <ex>ilio</ex>-femoral, <ex>ilio</ex>-lumbar, <ex>ilio</ex>-psoas, etc.</as>

Iliofemoral

Adjective

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to the ilium and femur; <as>as, <ex>iliofemoral</ex> ligaments</as>.

Iliolumbar

Adjective

  1. (Anat.): Pertaining to the iliac and lumbar regions; <as>as, the <ex>iliolumbar</ex> artery</as>.

Iliopsoas

Noun

  1. (Anat.): The great flexor muscle of the hip joint, divisible into two parts, the iliac and great psoas, -- often regarded as distinct muscles.

Ilium

Noun

Etymology

See Ileum.

  1. (Anat.): The dorsal one of the three principal bones comprising either lateral half of the pelvis; the dorsal or upper part of the hip bone. See <cref>Innominate bone</cref>, under Innominate.</def> <altsp>[Written also <asp>ilion</asp>, and <asp>ileum</asp>.]</altsp>

Ilixanthin

Noun

Etymology

<ets>Ilex</ets> the genus including the holly + Gr. yellow.

  1. (Chem.): A yellow dye obtained from the leaves of the holly.

Ill

Adjective

<wordforms>[The regular comparative and superlative are wanting, their places being supplied by worse () and worst (), from another root.]</wordforms> <ety>[OE. <ets>ill</ets>, <ets>ille</ets>, Icel. <ets>illr</ets>; akin to Sw. <ets>illa</ets>, adv., Dan. <ets>ilde</ets>, adv.

  1. Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.

Neither is it ill air only that maketh an ill seat, but ill ways, ill markets, and ill neighbors. Bacon.

There 's some ill planet reigns. Shak.

  1. Contrary to good, in a moral sense; evil; wicked; wrong; iniquitious; naughtly; bad; improper.

Of his own body he was ill, and gave

The clergy ill example.

Shak.
  1. Sick; indisposed; unwell; diseased; disordered; <as>as, <ex>ill</ex> of a fever</as>.

I am in health, I breathe, and see thee ill. Shak.

  1. Not according with rule, fitness, or propriety; incorrect; rude; unpolished; inelegant.

That 's an ill phrase. Shak.

<cs><col>Ill at ease</col>, <cd>uneasy; uncomfortable; anxious. I am very ill at ease." Shak.</cd> -- <col>Ill blood</col>, <cd>enmity; resentment.</cd> -- <col>Ill breeding</col>, <cd>want of good breeding; rudeness.</cd> -- <col>Ill fame</col>, <cd>ill or bad repute; as, a house of ill fame, a house where lewd persons meet for illicit intercourse.</cd> -- <col>Ill humor</col>, <cd>a disagreeable mood; bad temper.</cd> -- <col>Ill nature</col>, <cd>bad disposition or temperament; sullenness; esp., a disposition to cause unhappiness to others.</cd> -- <col>Ill temper</col>, <cd>anger; moroseness; crossness.</cd> -- <mcol><col>Ill turn</col>. <sd>(a)</sd> <cd>An unkind act.</cd> <sd>(b)</sd> <cd>A slight attack of illness</cd>. [Colloq. U.S.] -- <col>Ill will</col></mcol>, <cd>unkindness; enmity; malevolence.</cd></cs>

<syn>Syn. -- Bad; evil; wrong; wicked; sick; unwell.</syn>