Wiktionary:Webster 1913/772

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institute[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Instituted ; Present participle Instituting.]

  1. To set up; to establish; to ordain; <as>as, to <ex>institute</ex> laws, rules, etc.</as>
  2. To originate and establish; to found; to organize; <as>as, to <ex>institute</ex> a court, or a society</as>.
    Quotations
    • Whenever any from of government becomes destructive of these ends it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new government.

Jefferson (Decl. of Indep. )]]

  1. To nominate; to appoint (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • We institute your Grace

To be our regent in these parts of France. Shak]]

  1. To begin; to commence; to set on foot; <as>as, to <ex>institute</ex> an inquiry; to <ex>institute</ex> a suit.</as>
    Quotations
    • And haply institute

A course of learning and ingenious studies. Shak]]

  1. To ground or establish in principles and rudiments; to educate; to instruct (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • If children were early instituted, knowledge would insensibly insinuate itself.

Dr. H. More]]

  1. (Eccl. Law): To invest with the spiritual charge of a benefice, or the care of souls.

Blackstone]]

<syn>Syn. -- To originate; begin; commence; establish; found; erect; organize; appoint; ordain.</syn>

institute[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. institutum: cf. F. institut. See Institute, (Transitive verb & adjective)

  1. The act of instituting; institution (Obsolete): Water sanctified by Christ's institute."

Milton]]

  1. That which is instituted, established, or fixed, as a law, habit, or custom.

Glover]]

  1. Hence: An elementary and necessary principle; a precept, maxim, or rule, recognized as established and authoritative; usually in the plural, a collection of such principles and precepts; esp., a comprehensive summary of legal principles and decisions; <as>as, the <ex>Institutes</ex> of Justinian; Coke's <ex>Institutes</ex> of the Laws of England</as>. Cf. Digest, (noun)
    Quotations
    • They made a sort of institute and digest of anarchy.

Burke]]

  1. Quotations
    • To make the Stoics' institutes thy own.

Dryden]]

  1. An institution; a society established for the promotion of learning, art, science, etc.; a college; <as>as, the <ex>Institute</ex> of Technology</as>; also, a building owned or occupied by such an institute; <as>as, the Cooper <ex>Institute</ex></as>.
  2. (Scots Law): The person to whom an estate is first given by destination or limitation.

Tomlins]]

<cs><col>Institutes of medicine</col>, <cd>theoretical medicine; that department of medical science which attempts to account philosophically for the various phenomena of health as well as of disease; physiology applied to the practice of medicine.</cd>

Dunglison]] </cs>

instituter[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. An institutor (Rare):

institution[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. institutio: cf. F. institution.]

  1. The act or process of instituting; as: <sd>(a)</sd> Establishment; foundation; enactment; <as>as, the <ex>institution</ex> of a school</as>.
    Quotations
    • The institution of God's law is described as being established by solemn injunction.

Hooker]]

<sd>(b)</sd> #Instruction; education . (Obsolete): Bentley. <sd>(c)</sd>

  1. (Eccl. Law): The act or ceremony of investing a clergyman with the spiritual part of a benefice, by which the care of souls is committed to his charge .

Blackstone]]

  1. That which instituted or established ; as: <sd>(a)</sd> #Established order, method, or custom; enactment; ordinance; permanent form of law or polity.
    Quotations
    • The nature of our people,

Our city's institutions. Shak]]

<sd>(b)</sd> #An established or organized society or corporation; an establishment, especially of a public character, or affecting a community; a foundation; as, a literary institution; a charitable institution; also, a building or the buildings occupied or used by such organization; as, the Smithsonian Institution . <sd>(c)</sd> #Anything forming a characteristic and persistent feature in social or national life or habits .

  1. Quotations
    • We ordered a lunch (the most delightful of English institutions, next to dinner) to be ready against our return.

Hawthorne]]

  1. That which institutes or instructs; a textbook; a system of elements or rules; an institute (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • There is another manuscript, of above three hundred years old, . . . being an institution of physic.

Evelyn]]

institutional[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to, or treating of, institutions; <as>as, <ex>institutional</ex> legends</as>.
    Quotations
    • Institutional writers as Rousseau.

J. S. Mill]]

  1. Instituted by authority.
  2. Elementary; rudimental.

institutionary[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Relating to an institution, or institutions.
  2. Containing the first principles or doctrines; elemental; rudimentary.

institutist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A writer or compiler of, or a commentator on, institutes (Rare):

Harvey]]

institutive[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Tending or intended to institute; having the power to establish.

Barrow]]

  1. Established; depending on, or characterized by, institution or order Institutive decency."

Milton]]

institutively[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In conformity with an institution.

Harrington]]

institutor[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L.: cf. F. instituteur.]

  1. One who institutes, founds, ordains, or establishes.
  2. One who educates; an instructor (Obsolete):

Walker]]

  1. (Episcopal Church): A presbyter appointed by the bishop to institute a rector or assistant minister over a parish church.

instop[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To stop; to close; to make fast; <as>as, to <ex>instop</ex> the seams</as> (Obsolete):

Dryden]]

instore[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Instaurate, Store.]

  1. To store up; to inclose; to contain (Obsolete):

Wyclif]]

instratified[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Interstratified.

instruct[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. instructus, p. p. of instruere to furnish, provide, construct, instruct; pref. in- in, + struere. See Structure.]

  1. Arranged; furnished; provided (Obsolete): He had neither ship instruct with oars, nor men."

Chapman]]

  1. Instructed; taught; enlightened (Obsolete):

Milton]]

instruct[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To put in order; to form; to prepare (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • They speak to the merits of a cause, after the proctor has prepared and instructed the same for a hearing.

Ayliffe]]

  1. To form by communication of knowledge; to inform the mind of; to impart knowledge or information to; to enlighten; to teach; to discipline.
    Quotations
    • Schoolmasters will I keep within my house,

Fit to instruct her youth. Shak]]

  1. To furnish with directions; to advise; to direct; to command; <as>as, the judge <ex>instructs</ex> the jury</as>.
    Quotations
    • She, being before instructed of her mother, said, Give me here John Baptist's head in a charger.

Matt. xiv. 8]]

  1. Quotations
    • Take her in; instruct her what she has to do.

Shak]]

<syn>Syn. -- To teach; educate; inform; train; discipline; indoctrinate; direct; enjoin.</syn>

instructer[edit]

Noun[edit]

<def>See instructor.

instructible[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Capable of being instructed; teachable; docible.

Bacon]]

instruction[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. instructio: cf. F. instruction.]

  1. The act of instructing, teaching, or furnishing with knowledge; information.
  2. That which instructs, or with which one is instructed; the intelligence or information imparted; as: <sd>(a)</sd> Precept; information; teachings. <sd>(b)</sd> Direction; order; command If my instructions may be your guide."

Shak]]

<syn>Syn. -- Education; teaching; indoctrination; information; advice; counsel. See Education.</syn>

instructional[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to, or promoting, instruction; educational.

instructive[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. F. instructif.]

  1. Conveying knowledge; serving to instruct or inform; <as>as, experience furnishes very <ex>instructive</ex> lessons</as>.

Addison]]

  1. Quotations
    • In various talk the instructive hours they past.

Pope]]

-- <wordforms><wf>In*struct"ive*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>In*struct"ive*ness</wf>, n.

  1. Quotations
    • The pregnant instructiveness of the Scripture.

Boyle]]

instructor[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., a preparer: cf. F. instructeur.] <altsp>[Written also <asp>instructer</asp>.]</altsp>

  1. One who instructs; one who imparts knowledge to another; a teacher.

instructress[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A woman who instructs; a preceptress; a governess.

Johnson]]

instrument[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. instrument, L. instrumentum. See Instruct.]

  1. That by means of which any work is performed, or result is effected; a tool; a utensil; an implement; <as>as, the <ex>instruments</ex> of a mechanic; astronomical <ex>instruments</ex>.</as>
    Quotations
    • All the lofty instruments of war.

Shak]]

  1. A contrivance or implement, by which musical sounds are produced; <as>as, a musical <ex>instrument</ex></as>.
    Quotations
    • Praise him with stringed instruments and organs.

Ps. cl. 4]]

  1. Quotations
    • But signs when songs and instruments he hears.

Dryden]]

  1. (Law): A writing, as the means of giving formal expression to some act; a writing expressive of some act, contract, process, as a deed, contract, writ, etc.

Burrill]]

  1. One who, or that which, is made a means, or is caused to serve a purpose; a medium, means, or agent.
    Quotations
    • Or useful serving man and instrument,

To any sovereign state. Shak]]

  1. Quotations
    • The bold are but the instruments of the wise.

Dryden]]

<syn>Syn. -- Tool; implement; utensil; machine; apparatus; channel; agent.</syn>

instrument[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To perform upon an instrument; to prepare for an instrument; <as>as, a sonata <ex>instrumented</ex> for orchestra</as>.

instrumentary[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Instrumental (Rare):

instrumentation[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The act of using or adapting as an instrument; a series or combination of instruments; means; agency.
    Quotations
    • Otherwise we have no sufficient instrumentation for our human use or handling of so great a fact.

H. Bushnell]]

<-- (b). The act of using instruments to measure or control the behavior of an object, as a patient in a hospital or a machine being tested while under development. -->

  1. (Mus.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd>
  2. The arrangement of a musical composition for performance by a number of different instruments; orchestration; instrumental composition; composition for an orchestra or military band <sd>(b)</sd>
  3. The act or manner of playing upon musical instruments; performance; <as>as, his <ex>instrumentation</ex> is perfect</as>.

<-- Instrumented, a. having instruments attached for the purpose of measuring conditions while under observation; said of a person under medical observation or a machine whose performance is being tested. -->

instrumentist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A performer on a musical instrument; an instrumentalist.

instyle[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To style (Obsolete):

Crashaw]]

insuavity[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insuavitas: cf. F. insuavité. See <er>In-</er> not, and Suavity.]

  1. Want of suavity; unpleasantness (Obsolete):

Burton]]

insubjection[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Want of subjection or obedience; a state of disobedience, as to government.

insubmergible[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not capable of being submerged; buoyant (Rare):

insubmission[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Want of submission; disobedience; noncompliance.

insubordinate[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Not submitting to authority; disobedient; rebellious; mutinous

insubordination[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. F. insubordination.]

  1. The quality of being insubordinate; disobedience to lawful authority.

insubstantial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Unsubstantial; not real or strong Insubstantial pageant." (Rare):

Shak]]

insubstantiality[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Unsubstantiality; unreality (Rare):

insuccation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insucare, insucatum, to soak in; pref. in- + succus, sucus, sap.]

  1. The act of soaking or moistening; maceration; solution in the juice of herbs (Obsolete):

Coxe]]

  1. Quotations
    • The medicating and insuccation of seeds.

Evelyn]]

insuccess[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Want of success (Rare):

Feltham]]

insue[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. See Ensue, (Intransitive verb)

insuetude[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insuetudo, from insuetus unaccustomed; pref. in- not + suetus, p. p. of suescere to be accustomed.]

  1. The state or quality of being unaccustomed; absence of use or habit.
    Quotations
    • Absurdities are great or small in proportion to custom or insuetude.

Landor]]

insufferable[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Incapable of being suffered, borne, or endured; insupportable; unendurable; intolerable; <as>as, <ex>insufferable</ex> heat, cold, or pain; <ex>insufferable</ex> wrongs.</as>

Locke]]

  1. Offensive beyond endurance; detestable.
    Quotations
    • A multitude of scribblers who daily pester the world with their insufferable stuff.

Dryden]]

insufferably[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In a manner or to a degree beyond endurance; intolerably; <as>as, a blaze <ex>insufferably</ex> bright; a person <ex>insufferably</ex> proud.</as>

insufficience[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Insufficiency.

Shak]]

insufficiency[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insufficientia: cf. F. insuffisance, whence OE. insuffisance. See Insufficient.]

  1. The quality or state of being insufficient; want of sufficiency; deficiency; inadequateness; <as>as, the <ex>insufficiency</ex> of provisions, of an excuse, etc.</as>
    Quotations
    • The insufficiency of the light of nature is, by the light of Scripture, . . . fully supplied.

Hooker]]

  1. Want of power or skill; inability; incapacity; incompetency; <as>as, the <ex>insufficiency</ex> of a man for an office</as>.

insufficient[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insufficiens, -entis. See <er>In-</er> not, and Sufficient.]

  1. Not sufficient; not enough; inadequate to any need, use, or purpose; <as>as, the provisions are <ex>insufficient</ex> in quantity, and defective in quality</as> Insufficient for His praise."

Cowper]]

  1. Wanting in strength, power, ability, capacity, or skill; incompetent; incapable; unfit; <as>as, a person <ex>insufficient</ex> to discharge the duties of an office</as>.

<syn>Syn. -- Inadequate; scanty; incommensurate; unequal; unfit; incompetent; incapable; inefficient.</syn>

insufficiently[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In an insufficient manner or degree; unadequately.

Insufflation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insuffatio: cf. F. insuffation. See <er>In-</er> in, and Sufflation.]

  1. The act of breathing on or into anything ; especially: <sd>(a)</sd>
  2. (R. C. Ch.): The breathing upon a person in the sacrament of baptism to symbolize the inspiration of a new spiritual life . <sd>(b)</sd>
  3. (Med.): The act of blowing (a gas, powder, or vapor) into any cavity of the body.

insuitable[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Unsuitable (Obsolete): -- <wordforms><wf>In*suit`a*bil"i*ty</wf> , n. (Obsolete):

Insular[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. insularis, fr. insula island: cf. F. insulaire. See Isle.]

  1. Of or pertaining to an island; of the nature, or possessing the characteristics, of an island; <as>as, an <ex>insular</ex> climate, fauna, etc.</as>
  2. Of or pertaining to the people of an island; narrow; circumscribed; illiberal; contracted; <as>as, <ex>insular</ex> habits, opinions, or prejudices</as>.
    Quotations
    • The penury of insular conversation.

Johnson]]

insular[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. An islander (Rare):

Berkeley]]

insularity[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. F. insularité.]

  1. The state or quality of being an island or consisting of islands; insulation.
    Quotations
    • The insularity of Britain was first shown by Agricola, who sent his fleet round it.

Pinkerton]]

  1. Narrowness or illiberality of opinion; prejudice; exclusiveness; <as>as, the <ex>insularity</ex> of the Chinese or of the aristocracy</as>.

insularly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In an insular manner.

insulary[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Insular (Obsolete):

Howell]]

insulate[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

[Imperfect and past participle Insulated ; Present participle Insulating .]

Etymology[edit]

L. insulatus insulated, fr. insula island. See Isle, and cf. Isolate.]

  1. To make an island of (Obsolete):

Pennant]]

  1. To place in a detached situation, or in a state having no communication with surrounding objects; to isolate; to separate.
  2. (Elec. & Thermotics): To prevent the transfer o electricity or heat to or from (bodies) by the interposition of nonconductors.

<cs><col>Insulating stool</col>

  1. (Elec.)</fld>, <cd>a stool with legs of glass or some other nonconductor of electricity, used for insulating a person or any object placed upon it.</cd></cs>