Wiktionary:Webster 1913/797

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Jangler[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old French jangleor

Noun[edit]

  1. An idle talker; a babbler; a prater. - Chaucer
  2. A wrangling, noisy fellow.

Jangleress[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A female prater or babbler.

Janglery[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old French janglerie chattering, talk

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Jangling. - Chaucer

Jangling[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Producing discordant sounds
    Quotations

Jangling[edit]

  1. Idle babbling; vain disputation.
    Quotations
    • From which some, having swerved, have turned aside unto vain jangling - . 1 Timothy, 1:6
  2. Wrangling; altercation - Lamb

Janissary[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. See janizary

Janitor[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin from janua a door

Noun[edit]

  1. A door-keeper; a porter; one who has the care of a public building, or a building occupied for offices, suites of rooms, etc.

Janitress[edit]

Variant[edit]

Janitrix

Etymology[edit]

Latin janitrix. See janitor

Noun[edit]

  1. A female janitor.

Janizar[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Rare): A janizary - Byron

Janizarian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to the janizaries, or their government - Burke

Janizary[edit]

Variant[edit]

janissary

Etymology[edit]

French janissaire, from Turkish yei-tsheri new soldiers or troops

Plural noun[edit]

  1. A soldier of a privileged military class, which formed the nucleus of the Turkish infantry, but was suppressed in 1826

Janker[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Scots): A long pole on two wheels, used in hauling logs - Jamieson

Jansenism[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French Jansénisme

Noun[edit]

  1. (Ecclesiastical History): The doctrine of Cornelius Jansen regarding free will and divine grace

Jansenist[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French Janséniste

Noun[edit]

  1. (Ecclesiastical History): A follower of Cornelius Jansen , a Roman Catholic bishop of Ypres, in Flanders, in the 17th century, who taught certain doctrines denying free will and the possibility of resisting divine grace.

Jant[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. See jaunt

Janthina[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): See ianthina

Jantily[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. See jauntily

Jantiness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. See jauntiness

Jantu[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A machine of great antiquity, used in Bengal for raising water to irrigate land. - Knight

Janty[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. See jaunty

January[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin Januarius, from Janus an old Latin deity, the god of the sun and the year, to whom the month of January was sacred; compare janua a door, Sanskrit y&257; to go

Noun[edit]

  1. The first month of the year, containing thirty-one days
    Note: Before the adoption of New Style, the commencement of the year was usually reckoned from March 25.

Janus[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin. See January

Noun[edit]

  1. (Roman Antiquities): A Latin deity represented with two faces looking in opposite directions. Numa is said to have dedicated to Janus the covered passage at Rome, near the Forum, which is usually called the Temple of Janus. This passage was open in war and closed in peace. - Dr. W. Smith

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Janus cloth: a fabric having both sides dressed, the sides being of different colors, -- used for reversible garments.

Janus-faced[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Double-faced; deceitful. Janus-faced lock, one having duplicate faces so as to go upon a right or a left hand door, the key entering on either side indifferently. - Knight

Janus-headed[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Double-headed

Japan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

the country Japan

Noun[edit]

Work varnished and figured in the Japanese manner; also, the varnish or lacquer used in japanning.

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware

Derived terms[edit]

  • Japan allspice, (Botany): a spiny shrub from Japan (Chimonanthus fragrans), related to the Carolina allspice
  • Japan black, (Chemistry): a quickly drying black lacquer or varnish, consisting essentially of asphaltum dissolved in naphtha or turpentine, and used for coating ironwork; -- called also Brunswick black, Japan lacquer, or simply Japan
  • Japan camphor, ordinary camphor brought from China or Japan, as distinguished from the rare variety called borneol or Borneo camphor
  • Japan clover, Japan pea (Botany), a cloverlike plant (Lespedeza striata ) from Eastern Asia, useful for fodder, first noticed in the Southern United States about 1860, but now become very common. During the Civil War it was called variously Yankee clover and Rebel clover
  • Japan earth. See Catechu
  • Japan ink, a kind of writing ink, of a deep, glossy black when dry
  • Japan varnish, a varnish prepared from the milky juice of the Rhus vernix, a small Japanese tree related to the poison sumac.

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: japanned
Present participle: Japanning

  1. To cover with a coat of hard, brilliant varnish, in the manner of the Japanese; to lacquer.
  2. (Rare): To give a glossy black to, as shoes. - Gay

Japanese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Of or pertaining to Japan, or its inhabitants.

Noun[edit]

singular and plural

  1. A native or inhabitant of Japan; collectively, the people of Japan.
  2. (singular only): The language of the people of Japan.

Japanned[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Treated, or coated, with varnish in the Japanese manner

Derived expression[edit]

  • Japanned leather: leather treated with coatings of Japan varnish, and dried in a stove - Knight

Japanner[edit]

  1. One who varnishes in the manner of the Japanese, or one skilled in the art.
  2. (Rare): A bootblack

Japanning[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The art or act of varnishing in the Japanese manner.

Japannish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. After the manner of the Japanese; resembling japanned articles - Carlyle

Jape[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from the same source as gab, influenced by French japper to yelp. See gab to deceive

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To jest; to play tricks; to jeer - Chaucer

Jape[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To mock; to trick - Chaucer
    Quotations
    • I have not been putting a jape upon you. - Sir W. Scott
    • The coy giggle of the young lady to whom he has imparted his latest merry jape. - W. Besant

Japer[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): A jester; a buffoon. - Chaucer

Japery[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old French japerie a yelping

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Jesting; buffoonery. - Chaucer

Japhethite[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A Japhetite - Kitto

Japhetic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to, or derived from, Japheth, one of the sons of Noah; as, Japhetic nations, the nations of Europe and Northern Asia; Japhetic languages.

Japhetite[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A descendant of Japheth.

Japonica[edit]

Etymology[edit]

New Latin, Japanese, from Japonia Japan

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A species of Camellia (Camellia Japonica), a native of Japan, bearing beautiful red or white flowers. Many other genera have species of the same name.

Jar[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See ajar

Noun[edit]

  1. A turn. [Only in phrase.] On the jar, on the turn, ajar, as a door.

Jar[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

French jarre, Spanish jarra, from Arabic jarrah ewer; compare Persian jarrah

Noun[edit]

  1. A deep, broad-mouthed vessel of earthenware or glass, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes; as, a jar of honey; a rose jar. - Dryden
  2. The measure of what is contained in a jar; as, a jar of oil; a jar of preserves. Bell jar, Leyden jar.

Jar[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare Old English charken to creak, Anglo Saxon cearcian to gnash, French jars a gander, Latin garrire to chatter, prate, Old High German kerran to chatter, croak, German quarren to grumble, and English jargon, ajar

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: jarred
Present participle: jarring

  1. To give forth a rudely quivering or tremulous sound; to sound harshly or discordantly; as, the notes jarred on my ears.
    Quotations
    • When such strings jar, what hope of harmony? - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part II, II-i
    • A string may jar in the best master's hand. - Roscommon
  2. To act in opposition or disagreement; to clash; to interfere; to quarrel; to dispute.
    Quotations
    • When those renowned noble peers Greece Through stubborn pride among themselves did jar. - Spenser
    • For orders and degrees Jar not with liberty, but well consist. - Milton

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. To cause a short, tremulous motion of, to cause to tremble, as by a sudden shock or blow; to shake; to shock; as, to jar the earth; to jar one's faith.
  2. (Obsolete): To tick; to beat; to mark or tell off.
    Quotations
    • My thoughts are minutes, and with sighs they jar Their watches on unto mine eyes. - Shakespeare, Richard II, V-v

Noun[edit]

  1. A rattling, tremulous vibration or shock; a shake; a harsh sound; a discord; as, the jar of a train; the jar of harsh sounds.
  2. Clash of interest or opinions; collision; discord; debate; slight disagreement.
    Quotations
    • And yet his peace is but continual jar. - Spenser
    • Cease, cease these jars, and rest your minds in peace. - Shakespeare, Henry VI Part I, I-i
  3. A regular vibration, as of a pendulum.
    Quotations
    • I love thee not a jar of the clock. Shakespeare, Winter’s Tale, I-ii
  4. (Plural): In deep well boring, a device resembling two long chain links, for connecting a percussion drill to the rod or rope which works it, so that the drill is driven down by impact and is jerked loose when jammed.

Jararaca[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Pidgin, from the native name

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): A poisonous serpent of Brazil (Bothrops jararaca), about eighteen inches long, and of a dusky, brownish color, variegated with red and black spots.

Jarble[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

  1. (Provincial English): To wet; to bemire - Halliwell

Jardinière[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French, feminine of jardinier gardener. See garden

Noun[edit]

  1. An ornamental stand or receptacle for plants, flowers, etc., used as a piece of decorative furniture in room.

Jards[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French jarde, jardon

Noun[edit]

  1. (Farriery): A callous tumor on the leg of a horse, below the hock.

Jargle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old Swedish jerga to repeat angrily, to brawl, Icelandic jarg tedious iteration, French jargonner to talk jargon. See jargon gabble

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To emit a harsh or discordant sound. - Bp. Hall

Jargon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Fench jargon, Old French also gargon, perhaps akin to English garrulous, or gargle

Noun[edit]

  1. Confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang
    Quotations
    • A barbarous jargon - Macaulay
    • All jargon of the schools - Prior
    • The jargon which serves the traffickers. - Johnson
  2. an idiom with frequent use of informal technical terms, as acronyms, used by specialists

Intransitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle: jargoned
Present participle: jargoning

  1. To utter jargon; to emit confused or unintelligible sounds; to talk unintelligibly, or in a harsh and noisy manner.
    Quotations
    • The noisy jay, Jargoning like a foreigner at his food. - Longfellow

Etymology 2[edit]

English jargon, Italian jiargone; perhaps from Persian zargn gold-colored, from zar gold. Compare zircon

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A variety of zircon

Jargonelle[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French jargonelle a very gritty variety of pear. See jargon zircon

Noun[edit]

  1. A variety of pear which ripens early.

Jargonic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to the mineral jargon.

Jargonist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One addicted to jargon; one who uses cant or slang. - Macaulay

Jarl[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Icelandic, nobleman, chief. - See earl

Noun[edit]

  1. A chief; an earl; in English history, one of the leaders in the Danish and Norse invasions. - Longfellow

Jarnut[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Scandinavian origin: compare Danish jordnöd

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): An earthnut - Dr. Prior

Jarosite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Barranco Jaroso, in Spain

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): An ocher-yellow mineral occurring on minute rhombohedral crystals. It is a hydrous sulphate of iron and potash.

Jar-owl[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): The goatsucker

Jarrah[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The mahoganylike wood of the Australian Eucalyptus marginata.

Jarring[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See jar

Adjective[edit]

  1. Shaking; disturbing; discordant. A jarring sound - Dryden

Jarring[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A shaking; a tremulous motion; as, the jarring of a steamship, caused by its engines.
    Quotations
    • Discord; a clashing of interests. Endless jarrings and immortal hate - Dryden

Jarringly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In a jarring or discordant manner.

Jarvey[edit]

Variant[edit]

Jarvy

Noun[edit]

  1. (Slang England): The driver of a hackney coach. - Carlyle
  2. (Slang England): A hackney coach
    Quotations
    • The litter at the bottom of the jarvy. - T. Hook

Jasey[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A wig; -- so called, perhaps, from being made of, or resembling, Jersey yarn. - Thackeray

Jashawk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A corruption of eyas hawk

Noun[edit]

  • (Zoölogy): A young hawk. - Booth

Jasmine[edit]

Variant[edit]

jessamine

Etymology[edit]

French jasmin, Spanish jazmin, Arabic yāsm&#299n, Persian yāsmīn; compare Italian gesmino, gelsomino

Noun[edit]

  1. (Botany): A shrubby plant of the genus Jasminum, bearing flowers of a peculiarly fragrant odor. The J. officinale, common in the south of Europe, bears white flowers. The Arabian jasmine is J. Sambac, and, with J. angustifolia, comes from the East Indies. The yellow false jasmine in the Gelseminum sempervirens (see Gelsemium). Several other plants are called jasmine in the West Indies, as species of Calotropis and Faramea.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Cape jasmine, or Cape jessamine, the Gardenia florida, a shrub with fragrant white flowers, a native of China, and hardy in the Southern United States.

Jasp[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): Jasper - Spenser

Jaspachate[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin iaspachates, Greek

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy), (Obsolete): Agate jasper

Jasper[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English jaspre, jaspe, Old French jaspre, jaspe, French jaspe, Latin iaspis, Greek; compare Persian yashp, yashf, Arabic.yashb, yasb, yasf, Hebrew yāshpheh. Compare diaper

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): An opaque, impure variety of quartz, of red, yellow, and other dull colors, breaking with a smooth surface. It admits of a high polish, and is used for vases, seals, snuff boxes, etc. When the colors are in stripes or bands, it is called striped or banded jasper. The Egyptian pebble is a brownish yellow jasper.

Derived expressions[edit]

  • Jasper opal: a yellow variety of opal resembling jasper
  • Jasper ware: a delicate kind of earthenware invented by Josiah Wedgwood. It is usually white, but is capable of receiving color

Jasperated[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. mixed with jasper; containing particles of jasper; as, jasperated agate.

Jasperize[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Usual past participle: Jasperized

  1. To convert into, or make to resemble, jasper.
    Quotations

Jaspery[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of the nature of jasper; mixed with jasper

Jaspidean[edit]

Variant[edit]

Jaspideous

Etymology[edit]

Latin iaspideus. See jasper

Adjective[edit]

  1. Consisting of jasper, or containing jasper; jaspery; jasperlike.

Jaspilite[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Jasper + -lite

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): A compact siliceous rock resembling jasper.

Jaspoid[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French jaspoïde; jaspe jasper + Greek form

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Rare): Resembling jasper

Jasponyx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin iasponyx, Greek . See jasper, and onyx

Noun[edit]

  1. (Mineralogy): An onyx, part or all of whose layers consist of jasper.

Jatrophic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to physic nuts, the seeds of plants of the genus Jatropha.

Jaunce[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French jancer. Compare jounce, jaunt

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. (Obsolete): To ride hard; to jounce
    Quotations
    • Spurr'd, gall’d and tir’d by jauncing Bullingbrooke. - Shakespeare, Richard II, V-v