Wiktionary:Webster 1913/798

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Page 798[edit]

Java[edit]

Noun[edit]

1. One of the islands of the Malay Archipelago belonging to the Netherlands.

2. Java coffee, a kind of coffee brought from Java. Java cat (Zoöl.), the musang. -- Java sparrow (Zoöl.), a species of finch (Padda oryzivora), native of Java, but very commonly kept as a cage bird; -- called also ricebird, and paddy bird . In the male the upper parts are glaucous gray, the head and tail black, the under parts delicate rose, and the cheeks white. The bill is large and red. A white variety is also kept as a cage bird.

Javanese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Of or pertaining to Java, or to the people of Java. -- n. sing. & pl. A native or natives of Java.

Javel[edit]

Noun[edit]

A vagabond. [Obs.] Spenser.

Javelin[edit]

Noun[edit]

[F. javeline; akin to Sp. jabalina, It. giavelina, and F. javelot, OF. gavlot. Cf. Gavelock.] A sort of light spear, to be thrown or cast by thew hand; anciently, a weapon of war used by horsemen and foot soldiers; now used chiefly in hunting the wild boar and other fierce game. Flies the javelin swifter to its mark, Launched by the vigor of a Roman arm? Addison.

Javelin[edit]

Jave"lin, v. t. To pierce with a javelin. [R.] Tennyson.

Javelinier[edit]

Noun[edit]

A soldier armed with a javelin. Holland.

Jaw[edit]

Noun[edit]

[A modification of chaw, formed under the influence of F. joue the cheek. See Chaw, Chew.]

1. (Anat.) (a) One of the bones, usually bearing teeth, which form the framework of the mouth. (b) Hence, also, the bone itself with the teeth and covering. (c) In the plural, the mouth.

2. Fig.: Anything resembling the jaw of an animal in form or action; esp., pl., the mouth or way of entrance; as, the jaws of a pass; the jaws of darkness; the jaws of death. Shak.

3. (Mach.) (a) A notch or opening. (b) A notched or forked part, adapted for holding an object in place; as, the jaw of a railway-car pedestal. See Axle guard. (b) One of a pair of opposing parts which are movable towards or from each other, for grasping or crushing anything between them, as, the jaws of a vise, or the jaws of a stone-crushing machine.

4. (Naut.) The inner end of a boom or gaff, hollowed in a half circle so as to move freely on a mast.

5.Impudent or abusive talk. [Slang] H. Kingsley. Jaw bit (Railroad), a bar across the jaws of a pedestal underneath an axle box. -- Jaw breaker, a word difficult to pronounce. [Obs.]<-- also, a piece of hard candy --> -- Jaw rope (Naut.), a rope which holds the jaws of a gaff to the mast. -- Jaw tooth, a molar or grinder; a back tooth.

Jaw[edit]

Jaw, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jawed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Jawing.] To scold; to clamor. [Law] <-- generally, to talk, esp. long-windedly or without special purpose --> Smollett.

Jaw[edit]

Jaw, v. t. To assail or abuse by scolding. [Law]

Jawbone[edit]

Noun[edit]

The bone of either jaw; a maxilla or a mandible. <-- Jawbone. v. t. & i. To attempt to influence solely by talking, as contrasted with threatening or inducing by other means, e.g. legislation; esp. (1969, MW10) the use of public appeals by the President or other high government officials to influence the behavior of businessmen or labor leaders. "Jawbone them into forgoing price increases." -->

Jawed[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Having jaws; -- chiefly in composition; as, lantern-jawed. Jawed like a jetty." Skelton.

Jaw-fall[edit]

Noun[edit]

Depression of the jaw; hence, depression of spirits. M. Griffith (1660).

Jaw-fallen[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Dejected; chopfallen.

Jawfoot[edit]

Noun[edit]

(Zoöl.) See Maxilliped.

Jawing[edit]

Noun[edit]

Scolding; clamorous or abusive talk. [Slang] H. Kingsley.

Jawn[edit]

Jawn (?), v. i. See Yawn. [Obs.] Marston.

Jawy[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Relating to the jaws. Gayton.

Jayet[edit]

Noun[edit]

(Min.) See Jet. [Obs.]

Jayhawker[edit]

Noun[edit]

A name given to a free-booting, unenlisted, armed man or guerrilla. [A term of opprobrium used in the war of 1861-65, U. S.]

Jazel[edit]

Noun[edit]

A gem of an azure color. [Obs.]

Jazerant[edit]

[OF. jacerant, jaseran, Sp. jacerina, cota jacerina, fr. jazarino Algerine, fr. Ar. jaz&amacr;&imacr;r Algiers.]

Noun[edit]

A coat of defense made of small plates of metal sewed upon linen or the like; also, this kind of armor taken generally; as, a coat of jazerant.

Jealous[edit]

OE. jalous, gelus, OF. jalous, F. jaloux, LL. zelosus zealous, fr. zelus emulation, zeal, jealousy, Gr. . See Zeal, and cf. Zealous.]

Adjective[edit]

1. Zealous; solicitous; vigilant; anxiously watchful. I have been very jeolous for the Lord God of hosts. Kings xix. 10. How nicely jealous is every one of us of his own repute! Dr. H. More.

2. Apprehensive; anxious; suspiciously watchful. 'This doing wrong creates such doubts as these, Renders us jealous and disturbs our peace. Waller. The people are so jealous of the clergy's ambition. Swift.

3. Exacting exclusive devotion; intolerant of rivalry. Thou shalt worship no other God; for the Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God. Ex. xxxiv. 14.

4. Disposed to suspect rivalry in matters of interest and affection; apprehensive regarding the motives of possible rivals, or the fidelity of friends; distrustful; having morbid fear of rivalry in love or preference given to another; painfully suspicious of the faithfulness of husband, wife, or lover. If the spirit of jealousy come upon him, and he be jealous of his wife. Num. v. 14. To both these sisters have I sworn my love: Each jealous of the other, as the stung Are of the adder. Shak. It is one of the best bonds, both of chastity and obedience, in the wife, if she think her husband wise; which she will never do if she find him jealous. Bacon. Syn. -- Suspicious; anxious; envious. Jealous, Suspicious. Suspicious is the wider term. We suspect a person when we distrust his honesty and imagine he has some bad design. We are jealous when we suspect him of aiming to deprive us of what we dearly prize. Iago began by awakening the suspicions of Othello, and converted them at last into jealousy. Suspicion may be excited by some kind of accusation, not supported by evidence sufficient for conviction, but sufficient to trouble the repose of confidence." Jealousy is a painful apprehension of rivalship in cases that are peculiarly interesting to us." Cogan.

Jealoushood[edit]

Noun[edit]

Jealousy. [Obs.] Shak.

Jealously[edit]

Jeal"ous*ly, adv. In a jealous manner.

Jealousness[edit]

Noun[edit]

State or quality of being jealous.

Jealousy[edit]

pl. Jealousies (#). [ F. jalousie. See Jealous, and cf. Jalousie.]

Noun[edit]

The quality of being jealous; earnest concern or solicitude; painful apprehension of rivalship in cases nearly affecting one's happiness; painful suspicion of the faithfulness of husband, wife, or lover. I was jealous for jealousy. Zech. viii. 2. Jealousy is the . . . apprehension of superiority. Shenstone. Whoever had qualities to alarm our jealousy, had excellence to deserve our fondness. Rambler.

Jeames[edit]

[Corrup. of James.]

Noun[edit]

A footman; a flunky. [Slang, Eng.] Thackeray.

Jean[edit]

[Prob. named from Genoa. See Jane.]

Noun[edit]

A twilled cotton cloth. Satin jean, a kind of jean woven smooth and glossy, after the manner of satin.

Jears[edit]

Plural noun[edit]

(Naut.) See 1st Jeer (b).

Jeat[edit]

Noun[edit]

(Min.) See Jet. [Obs.]

Jedding ax[edit]

Noun[edit]

A stone mason's tool, having a flat face and a pointed part. Knight.

Jee[edit]

Jee (?), v. t. & i. See Gee.

Jeel[edit]

[Hind. jh&imacr;l.]

Noun[edit]

A morass; a shallow lake. [Written also jhil.] [India] Whitworth.

Jeerer[edit]

Noun[edit]

A scoffer; a railer; a mocker.

Jeering[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Mocking; scoffing

Noun[edit]

  1. A mocking utterance

Jeeringly[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Mockingly; scoffingly

Jeers[edit]

Jeers (?), n. pl. (Naut.) See 1st Jeer (b).

Jeffersonia[edit]

[NL. Named after Thomas Jefferson.]

Noun[edit]

(Bot.) An American herb with a pretty, white, solitary blossom, and deeply two-cleft leaves (Jeffersonia diphylla); twinleaf.

Jeffersonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson or his policy or political doctrines. Lowell.

Jejunal[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Pertaining to the jejunum.

Jejune[edit]

L. jejunus fasting, hungry, dry, barren, scanty; of unknown origin.]

Adjective[edit]

1. Lacking matter; empty; void of substance.

2. Void of interest; barren; meager; dry; as, a jejune narrative. - Je*june"ly, adv. -- Je*june"ness, n. Bacon.

Jejunity[edit]

Noun[edit]

The quality of being jejune; jejuneness.

Jejunum[edit]

NL., fr. L. jejunus empty, dry.]

Noun[edit]

(Anat.) The middle division of the small intestine, between the duodenum and ileum; -- so called because usually found empty after death.

Jelerang[edit]

Native name.]

Noun[edit]

(Zoöl.) A large, handsome squirrel (Sciurus Javensis), native of Java and Southern Asia; -- called also Java squirrel.

Jell[edit]

Jell (?), v. i. To jelly. [Colloq.]

Jellied[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Brought to the state or consistence of jelly.

Jelly[edit]

Formerly gelly, gely, F. gelée jelly, frost, fr. geler to freeze. L. gelare; akin to gelu frost. See Gelid.]

Noun[edit]

Plural: Jellies 1. Anything brought to a gelatinous condition; a viscous, translucent substance in a condition between liquid and solid; a stiffened solution of gelatin, gum, or the like.

2. The juice of fruits or meats boiled with sugar to an elastic consistence; as, currant jelly; calf's-foot jelly. Jelly bag, a bag through which the material for jelly is strained. -- Jelly mold, a mold for forming jelly in ornamental shapes. -- Jelly plant (Bot.), Australian name of an edible seaweed (Eucheuma speciosum), from which an excellent jelly is made. J. Smith. -- Jelly powder, an explosive, composed of nitroglycerin and collodion cotton; -- so called from its resemblance to calf's-foot jelly.

Jelly[edit]

Jel"ly, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jellied (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Jellying.] To become jelly; to come to the state or consistency of jelly.

Jemidar[edit]

Per. & Hind. jama-d&amacr;r.]

Noun[edit]

The chief or leader of a hand or body of persons; esp., in the native army of India, an officer of a rank corresponding to that of lieutenant in the English army. [Written also jemadar, jamadar.]

Jemlah goat[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoöl.) The jharal.

Jemminess[edit]

Noun[edit]

Spruceness. [Slang, Eng.] Pegge (1814).

Jemmy[edit]

Jem"my (?), a. [Cf. Gim, and Gimp, a.]

Adjective[edit]

Spruce. [Slang, Eng.] Smart.

Jemmy[edit]

Noun[edit]

1. A short crowbar. See Jimmy.

2. A baked sheep's head. [Slang, Eng.] Dickens.

Jeniquen[edit]

Sp. jeniquen.]

Noun[edit]

(Bot.) A Mexican name for the Sisal hemp (Agave rigida, var. Sisalana); also, its fiber. [Written also hen&imacr;equen.]

Jenite[edit]

Noun[edit]

(Min.) See Yenite.

Jenkins[edit]

Noun[edit]

name of contempt for a flatterer of persons high in social or official life; as, the Jenkins by a newspaper. [Colloq. Eng. & U.S.]