Wiktionary:Webster 1913/864

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Page 864

  1. Position; situation; a place; a spot; esp., a geographical place or situation, as of a mineral or plant
  2. Limitation to a county, district, or place; <as>as, <ex>locality</ex> of trial</as> - Blackstone
  3. (Phren.): The perceptive faculty concerned with the ability to remember the relative positions of places

Location[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>locatio</ets>, fr. <ets>locare</ets>.]

  1. The act or process of locating
  2. Situation; place; locality

Locke.

  1. That which is located; a tract of land designated in place

[U.S.]

  1. (Law)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <fld>(Civil Law): A leasing on rent

<sd>(b)</sd> <fld>(Scots Law): A contract for the use of a thing, or service of a person, for hire . Wharton. <sd>(c)</sd> <fld>(Amer. Law): The marking out of the boundaries, or identifying the place or site of, a piece of land, according to the description given in an entry, plan, map, etc

Burrill. Bouvier.

Lochage[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Gr..] <fld>(Gr. Antiq.): An officer who commanded a company; a captain

Mitford.

Lochan[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Gael. See 1st Loch.]

  1. A small lake; a pond

[Scot.]

  1. Quotations
    • A pond or lochan rather than a lake.

H. Miller]]

Loche[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Zoölogy): See Loach

Lochia[edit]

n. pl. <ety>[NL., from Gr. , pl., fr. belonging to childbirth, a lying in, childbirth.] <fld>(Med.): The discharge from the womb and vagina which follows childbirth

Lochial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>lochial</ets>.]

  1. Of or pertaining to the lochia

Lock[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>locc</ets>; akin to D. <ets>lok</ets>, G. <ets>locke</ets>, OHG. loc, Icel. <ets>lokkr</ets>, and perh. to Gr. to bend, twist.]

  1. A tuft of hair; a flock or small quantity of wool, hay, or other like substance; a tress or ringlet of hair
    Quotations
    • These gray locks, the pursuivants of death.

Shak]]

Lock[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>loc</ets> inclosure, an inclosed place, the fastening of a door, fr. <ets>l&umac;can</ets> to lock, fasten; akin to OS. <ets>l&umac;kan</ets> (in comp.), D. <ets>luiken</ets>, OHG. <ets>l&umac;hhan</ets>, Icel. <ets>lka</ets>, Goth. <ets>l&umac;kan</ets> (in comp.); cf. Skr. <ets>ruj</ets> to break. Cf. Locket.]

  1. Anything that fastens; specifically, a fastening, as for a door, a lid, a trunk, a drawer, and the like, in which a bolt is moved by a key so as to hold or to release the thing fastened
  2. A fastening together or interlacing; a closing of one thing upon another; a state of being fixed or immovable
    Quotations
    • Albemarle Street closed by a lock of carriages.

De Quincey]]

  1. A place from which egress is prevented, as by a lock

Dryden.

  1. The barrier or works which confine the water of a stream or canal
  2. An inclosure in a canal with gates at each end, used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from one level to another; -- called also <altname>lift lock</altname>
  3. That part or apparatus of a firearm by which the charge is exploded; <as>as, a match<ex>lock</ex>, flint<ex>lock</ex>, percussion <ex>lock</ex>, etc.</as>
  4. A device for keeping a wheel from turning
  5. A grapple in wrestling

Milton.

<cs><col>Detector lock</col>, <cd>a lock containing a contrivance for showing whether it as has been tampered with.</cd> -- <col>Lock bay</col> <fld>(Canals)</fld>, <cd>the body of water in a lock chamber.</cd> -- <col>Lock chamber</col>, <cd>the inclosed space between the gates of a canal lock.</cd> -- <col>Lock nut</col>. <cd>See <cref>Check nut</cref>, under Check.</cd> -- <col>Lock plate</col>, <cd>a plate to which the mechanism of a gunlock is attached.</cd> -- <col>Lock rail</col> <fld>(Arch.)</fld>, <cd>in ordinary paneled doors, the rail nearest the lock.</cd> <col>Lock rand</col> <fld>(Masonry)</fld>, <cd>a range of bond stone. Knight.</cd> -- <col>Mortise lock</col>, <cd>a door lock inserted in a mortise.</cd> -- <col>Rim lock</col>, <cd>a lock fastened to the face of a door, thus differing from a <cref>mortise lock</cref>.</cd></cs>

Lock[edit]

Transitive verb[edit]

Imperfect and past participle Locked ; Present participle Locking.]

  1. To fasten with a lock, or as with a lock; to make fast; to prevent free movement of; <as>as, to <ex>lock</ex> a door, a carriage wheel, a river, etc.</as>
  2. To prevent ingress or access to, or exit from, by fastening the lock or locks of; -- often with <ptcl>up</ptcl>; <as>as, to <ex>lock</ex> or <ex>lock up</ex>, a house, jail, room, trunk</as>. etc
  3. To fasten in or out, or to make secure by means of, or as with, locks; to confine, or to shut in or out -- often with <ptcl>up</ptcl>; <as>as, to <ex>lock</ex> one's self in a room; to <ex>lock</ex> up the prisoners; to <ex>lock</ex> up one's silver; to <ex>lock</ex> intruders out of the house; to <ex>lock</ex> money into a vault; to <ex>lock</ex> a child in one's arms; to <ex>lock</ex> a secret in one's breast.</as>
  4. To link together; to clasp closely; <as>as, to <ex>lock</ex> arms</as>

Lock hand in hand."

Shak.

  1. (Canals): To furnish with locks; also, to raise or lower (a boat) in a lock
  2. (Fencing): To seize, as the sword arm of an antagonist, by turning the left arm around it, to disarm him

Lock[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

  1. To become fast, as by means of a lock or by interlacing; <as>as, the door <ex>locks</ex> close</as>
    Quotations
    • When it locked none might through it pass.

Spenser]]

<cs><col>To lock into</col>, <cd>to fit or slide into; <as>as, they <ex>lock into<ex> each other</as>.</cd></cs>

Boyle.

Lockage[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Materials for locks in a canal, or the works forming a lock or locks
  2. Toll paid for passing the locks of a canal
  3. Amount of elevation and descent made by the locks of a canal
    Quotations
    • The entire lock will be about fifty feet.

De Witt Clinton]]

Lock-down[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A contrivance to fasten logs together in rafting; -- used by lumbermen

[U.S.]

Locked-jaw[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. See Lockjaw

Locken[edit]

obs. p. p. <def>of Lock

Chaucer.

Locken[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Bot.): The globeflower (<spn>Trollius</spn>)

Locker[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One who, or that which, locks
  2. A drawer, cupboard, compartment, or chest, esp. one in a ship, that may be closed with a lock

<cs><col>Chain locker</col> <fld>(Naut.)</fld>, <cd>a compartment in the hold of a vessel, for holding the chain cables.</cd> -- <mcol><col>Davy Jones's locker</col>, ∨ <col>Davy's locker</col></mcol>. <cd>See <er>Davy Jones</er>.</cd> -- <col>Shot locker</col>, <cd>a compartment where shot are deposited.</cd></cs>

Totten.

Locket[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[F. <ets>loquet</ets> latch, dim. of OF. <ets>loc</ets> latch, lock; of German origin. See Lock a fastening.]

  1. A small lock; a catch or spring to fasten a necklace or other ornament
  2. A little case for holding a miniature or lock of hair, usually suspended from a necklace or watch chain

Lock hospital[edit]

  1. . A hospital for the treatment of venereal diseases

[Eng.]

Lockjaw[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Med.): A contraction of the muscles of the jaw by which its motion is suspended; a variety of tetanus

Lockless[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Destitute of a lock

Lockman[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A public executioner

[Scot.]

Lockout[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The closing of a factory or workshop by an employer, usually in order to bring the workmen to satisfactory terms by a suspension of wages

Lockram[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[F. <ets>locrenan</ets>, <ets>locronan</ets>; from <ets>Locronan</ets>, in Brittany, where it is said to have been made.]

  1. A kind of linen cloth anciently used in England, originally imported from Brittany

Shak.

Locksmith[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. An artificer whose occupation is to make or mend locks

Lock step[edit]

  1. . A mode of marching by a body of men going one after another as closely as possible, in which the leg of each moves at the same time with the corresponding leg of the person before him

Lock stitch[edit]

  1. . A peculiar sort of stitch formed by the locking of two threads together, as in the work done by some sewing machines. See Stitch

Lockup[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A place where persons under arrest are temporarily locked up; a watchhouse

Lock-weir[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A waste weir for a canal, discharging into a lock chamber

Locky[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Having locks or tufts

(Rare):

Sherwood.

Locofoco[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Of uncertain etymol.; perh. for L. <ets>loco foci</ets> instead of fire; or, according to Bartlett, it was called so from a self-lighting cigar, with a match composition at the end, invented in 1834 by John Marck of New York, and called by him <ets>locofoco cigar</ets>, in imitation of the word <ets>locomotive</ets>, which by the uneducated was supposed to mean, self-moving.]

  1. A friction match

[U.S.]

  1. A nickname formerly given to a member of the Democratic party

[U.S.]

&hand; The name was first applied, in 1834, to a portion of the Democratic party, because, at a meeting in Tammany Hall, New York, in which there was great diversity of sentiment, the chairman left his seat, and the lights were extinguished, for the purpose of dissolving the meeting; when those who were opposed to an adjournment produced locofoco matches, rekindled the lights, continued the meeting, and accomplished their object.

Locomotion[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>locus</ets> place + <ets>motio</ets> motion: cf. F. <ets>locomotion</ets>. See Local, and Motion.]

  1. The act of moving from place to place. Animal locomotion." Milton.
  2. The power of moving from place to place, characteristic of the higher animals and some of the lower forms of plant life

<-- 3. the name of a song and a dance, briefly popular in the 1960's -->

Locomotive[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>locomotif</ets>. See Locomotion.]

  1. Moving from place to place; changing place, or able to change place; <as>as, a <ex>locomotive</ex> animal</as>
  2. Used in producing motion; <as>as, the <ex>locomotive</ex> organs of an animal</as>

Locomotive[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A locomotive engine; a self-propelling wheel carriage, especially one which bears a steam boiler and one or more steam engines which communicate motion to the wheels and thus propel the carriage, -- used to convey goods or passengers, or to draw wagons, railroad cars, etc. See Illustration in Appendix

<cs><col>Consolidation locomotive</col>, <cd>a locomotive having four pairs of connected drivers.</cd> -- <col>Locomotive car</col>, <cd>a locomotive and a car combined in one vehicle; a dummy engine.</cd> [U.S.] -- <col>Locomotive engine</col>. <cd>Same as Locomotive, above.</cd> -- <col>Mogul locomotive</col>. <cd>See Mogul.</cd></cs>

Locomotiveness, Locomotivity[edit]

<hw> n. <ety>[Cf. F. <ets>locomotivité</ets>.]

  1. The power of changing place

Locomotor[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[See Locomotion.]

  1. Of or pertaining to movement or locomotion

<cs><mcol><col>Locomotor ataxia</col>, ∨ <col>Progressive locomotor ataxy</col></mcol> <fld>(Med.)</fld>, <cd>a disease of the spinal cord characterized by peculiar disturbances of gait, and difficulty in coördinating voluntary movements.</cd></cs>

Loculament[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>loculamentum</ets> case, box, fr. <ets>loculus</ets> a compartment, dim. of <ets>locus</ets> place.] <fld>(Bot.): The cell of a pericarp in which the seed is lodged

Locular[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>locularis</ets>.] <fld>(Bot.): Of or relating to the cell or compartment of an ovary, etc.; in composition, having cells; as trilocular

Gray.

Loculate[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>loculatus</ets>.] <fld>(Bot.): Divided into compartments

Locule[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>locule</ets>. See Loculus.] <fld>(Zoölogy): A little hollow; a loculus

Loculicidal[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>loculus</ets> cell + <ets>caedere</ets> to cut: cf. F. <ets>loculicide</ets>.] <fld>(Bot.): Dehiscent through the middle of the back of each cell; -- said of capsules

Loculose, Loculous[edit]

<hw> a. <ety>[L. <ets>loculosus</ets>. See Loculament.] <fld>(Bot.): Divided by internal partitions into cells, as the pith of the pokeweed

Loculus[edit]

Noun[edit]

<plu>pl. <plw>Loculi</plw> </plu>. <ety>[L., little place, a compartment.]

  1. (Zoölogy): One of the spaces between the septa in the Anthozoa
  2. (Bot.): One of the compartments of a several-celled ovary; loculament

Locum tenens[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L., holding the place; <ets>locus</ets> place + <ets>tenens</ets>, p. pr. of <ets>tenere</ets> to hold. Cf. Lieutenant.]

  1. A substitute or deputy; one filling an office for a time

Locus[edit]

Noun[edit]

<plu>pl. <plw>Loci</plw> , & <plw>Loca</plw> </plu>. <ety>[L., place. Cf. Allow, Couch, Lieu, Local.]

  1. A place; a locality
  2. (Math.): The line traced by a point which varies its position according to some determinate law; the surface described by a point or line that moves according to a given law

<cs><col>Plane locus</col>, <cd>a locus that is a straight line, or a circle.</cd> -- <col>Solid locus</col>, <cd>a locus that is one of the conic sections.</cd></cs>

Locust[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[L. <ets>locusta</ets> locust, grasshopper. Cf. Lobster.]

  1. (Zoölogy): Any one of numerous species of long-winged, migratory, orthopterous insects, of the family <spn>Acrididæ</spn>, allied to the grasshoppers; esp., (<spn>Edipoda, ∨ Pachytylus, migratoria</spn>, and <spn>Acridium perigrinum</spn>, of Southern Europe, Asia, and Africa. In the United States the related species with similar habits are usually called <altname>grasshoppers</altname>. See Grasshopper

&hand; These insects are at times so numerous in Africa and the south of Asia as to devour every green thing; and when they migrate, they fly in an immense cloud. In the United States the harvest flies are improperly called locusts. See Cicada.

<cs><col>Locust beetle</col> <fld>(Zoölogy): </fld>, <cd>a longicorn beetle (<spn>Cyllene robiniæ</spn>), which, in the larval state, bores holes in the wood of the locust tree. Its color is brownish black, barred with yellow. Called also <altname>locust borer</altname>.</cd> -- <col>Locust bird</col> <fld>(Zoölogy): </fld> <cd>the rose-colored starling or pastor of India. See Pastor.</cd> -- <col>Locust hunter</col> <fld>(Zoölogy): </fld>, <cd>an African bird; the beefeater.</cd></cs>

2. <ety>[Etymol. uncertain.] <fld>(Bot.): The locust tree. See <er>Locust Tree</er> (definition, note, and phrases) <cs><col>Locust bean</col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a commercial name for the sweet pod of the carob tree.</cd></cs>

Locusta[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[NL.: cf. <ets>locuste</ets>.] <fld>(Bot.): The spikelet or flower cluster of grasses

Gray.

Locustella[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[NL., fr. L. <ets>locusta</ets> a locust.] <fld>(Zoölogy): The European cricket warbler

Locustic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Chem.): Pertaining to, or derived from, the locust; -- formerly used to designate a supposed acid

Locusting[edit]

p. a. <def>Swarming and devastating like locusts (Rare):

Tennyson.

Locust tree[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Etymol. uncertain.] <fld>(Bot.): A large North American tree of the genus <spn>Robinia</spn> (<spn>R. Pseudacacia</spn>), producing large slender racemes of white, fragrant, papilionaceous flowers, and often cultivated as an ornamental tree. In England it is called <altname>acacia</altname>

&hand; The name is also applied to other trees of different genera, especially to those of the genus <spn>Hymenæa</spn>, of which <spn>H. Courbaril</spn> is a lofty, spreading tree of South America; also to the carob tree (<spn>Ceratonia siliqua</spn>), a tree growing in the Mediterranean region.

<cs><col>Honey locust tree</col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a tree of the genus <spn>Gleditschia</spn> ) <spn>G. triacanthus</spn>), having pinnate leaves and strong branching thorns; -- so called from a sweet pulp found between the seeds in the pods. Called also simply <altname>honey locust</altname>.</cd> -- <col>Water locust tree</col> <fld>(Bot.)</fld>, <cd>a small swamp tree (<spn>Gleditschia monosperma</spn>), of the Southern United States.</cd></cs>