Wiktionary talk:International Phonetic Alphabet

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I am not quite sure about the bilabial and labiodental approximants. The 'w' in Dutch is a labiodental approximant (I think) unless you speak the Surinam version of it then it is a bilabial one as in English. Certainly for Dutch ears the difference is quite unmistakeable. It would seem that this table only has a symbol for one of them? nl:Gebruiker:Jcwf

Sample sounds[edit]

Not being a linguistics professional, I find the tables in this article not especially illuminating. How much trouble would it be to add sound clips to the symbols, so mere mortals could comprehend them? After all, pronunciation is primarily an aural concept. ~ Jeff Q 20:58, 2 March 2006 (UTC)

User:Dvortygirl often adds audio samples to entries. I asked her to add some to Wiktionary:Pronunciation key some time ago. See said she would do it (but said it might take awhile). I suggest you post a request on her talk page to remind her. Ncik 21:31, 2 March 2006 (UTC)
I think she didn't do them mainly because someone else already had. I'm not sure where that chart is now. --Connel MacKenzie 00:05, 17 November 2006 (UTC)

proper coding for phonetic alphabet[edit]

The phonetic alphabet consists mostly of question marks in my browser. Could someone put it in proper html code? Like "ü" should be "& u uml ;" (without the spaces) etc. Then every browser should show the right signs. Anjil 10:57, 14 September 2006 (UTC) 222

Where? If you use the template {{IPA}}, then it will display IPA characters correctly. If you need to insert a character in editing and the symbols do not appear correctly at the bottom of the page in the browser you're using, there is a workqround that I sometimes use. Just follow the link in the IPA template to the appropriate Wikipedia page, where all the symbols should be displayed correctly. --EncycloPetey 22:49, 16 November 2006 (UTC)

IPA to audio?[edit]

Is there an online engine to produce a sound file from an IPA pronunciation string? That would be very handy. 60.242.130.234 23:40, 16 August 2007 (UTC)

No. Part of the problem is that there are many extra little symbols that may be inserted into a string of "standard" characters to indicate secondary stress, aspiration, tone, etc. An engine will also be unable to produce regional accent, so it would be a very crude approximation. Conisder that the same IPA symbols might be used to code the word public, but it will sound different spoken by an Englishman, Irishman, Australian, etc. The biggest problem though, is dealing with the optional little symbols. --EncycloPetey 06:08, 17 August 2007 (UTC)