abrupt

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1583. From Latin abruptus (broken off), perfect passive participle of abrumpō (break off), formed from ab (from, away from) + rumpō (to break).[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈbɹʌpt/, /æˈbɹʌpt/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

abrupt (comparative more abrupt or abrupter, superlative most abrupt or abruptest)

  1. (obsolete, rare) Broken away (from restraint). [Attested only in the late 16th century.][1]
  2. Without notice to prepare the mind for the event; sudden; hasty; unceremonious. [First attested in the late 16th century.][1]
    The party came to an abrupt end when the parents of our host arrived.
  3. Curt in manner; brusque; rude; uncivil; impolite. [First attested in the late 16th century.][1]
  4. Having sudden transitions from one subject or state to another; unconnected; disjointed. [First attested in the late 16th century.][1]
    The abrupt style, which hath many breaches.
  5. (obsolete) Broken off. [Attested from the early 17th century until the mid 18th century.][1]
  6. Extremely steep or craggy as if broken up; precipitous. [First attested in the early 17th century.][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Thomson
      Tumbling through ricks abrupt.
  7. (botany) Suddenly terminating, as if cut off; truncate. [First attested in the early 19th century.][1]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gray to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

abrupt (third-person singular simple present abrupts, present participle abrupting, simple past and past participle abrupted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To tear off or asunder. [First attested in the mid 17th century.][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Sir T. Browne
      Till death abrupts them.
  2. To interrupt suddenly. [First attested in the mid 17th century.][1]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

abrupt (plural abrupts)

  1. (poetic) Something which is abrupt; an abyss. [First attested in the mid 17th century.][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Milton
      Over the vast abrupt.

References[edit]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 8
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

abrupt m (feminine abrupte, masculine plural abrupts, feminine plural abruptes)

  1. Extremely steep, near vertical.
  2. Curt and abrupt.
  3. Done or said forwardly and without caution to avoid shocking.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

abrupt

  1. abrupt, sudden

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

abrupt

  1. suddenly

Synonyms[edit]