apanthropinisation

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined by C. Grant B. Allen in 1880 in volume 5 of the quarterly-review journal Mind : Ap- (from Ancient Greek ἀπ- (ap-, off, away)) + anthropin(ism) (human-focused consideration) + -isation, noun suffix denoting the action of the suffixed verb.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

apanthropinisation (uncountable)

  1. (rare)[1] The broadening of the ambit of one’s preoccupations and concerns away from a narrow focus on those things most palpably human and most closely pertinent to humanity.[1][2]
    • 1880, Oct.: Charles Grant Blairfindie Allen [contrib.] and George Croom Robertson (editor) of the Mind Association, Mind, volume 5 (№ 20), page 451 (Williams and Norgate) · (also quoted, with scant little alteration, on page 292 of The Academy [№ 18, 1880])
      In short, the primitive human conception of beauty must, I believe, have been purely anthropinistic — must have gathered mainly around the personality of man or woman; and all its subsequent history must be that of an apanthropinisation (I apologise for the ugly but convenient word), a gradual regression or concentric widening of æsthetic feeling around this fixed point which remains to the very last its natural centre.
    • 1881, Jan.: The Popular Science Monthly, volume 18 (1880–1881), page 344 (D. Appleton); quoting verbatim, but not literatim, the text of the first occurrence in Mind [1880] hereinbefore (minor adjustments to Americanise the spelling have been made)
      In short, the primitive human conception of beauty must, I believe, have been purely anthropinistic — must have gathered mainly around the personality of man or woman; and all its subsequent history must be that of an apanthropinization (I apologize for the ugly but convenient word), a gradual regression or concentric widening of æsthetic feeling around this fixed point which remains to the very last its natural center.
    • 2005, Mar.: Anne-Julia Zwierlein (editor), Unmapped Countries: Biological Visions in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, page 114 (Anthem Press; ISBN 1843311607, 978‒1843311607)
      From this early, ‘anthropinistic’ stage, at which all aesthetic feeling is ‘gathered mainly around the personality of man or woman’, human aesthetic feeling gradually evolves in a process of apanthropinization, ‘a gradual regression or concentric widening of aesthetic feeling around this fixed point’,59 and advances to the appreciation of beauty in nature.60

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 apanthropinization” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  2. ^ “apanthropinization” listed on pages 50–51 of Joseph Twadell Shipley’s Dictionary of Early English (1955; Philosophical Library)