apposite

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin appositus, past participle of adponere, from ad- + ponere (to put, place).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

apposite (comparative more apposite, superlative most apposite)

  1. Appropriate, relevant, well-suited; fit.
  2. Positioned at rest in respect to another, be it side-to-side, front-to-front, back-to-back, or even three-dimensionally: in apposition.
    • 1971, University of London. School of Oriental and African Studies, Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Volume 34, page 262,
      In other words, they are used to name, rather than to describe. They are apposite nouns and not adjectives.
  3. Related, homologous.
    • 2000, David Skeele, "All That Monarchs Do": The Obscured Stages of Authority in Pericles, in Pericles: Critical Essays,
      If the shift in theatrical setting and the shift in dramaturgy are at all related, they are apposite developments, independent yet homologous signs of a changing political and cultural climate.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Noun[edit]

apposite (plural apposites)

  1. (rare) Something that is apposite
    • 1901, Charles L. Marson, Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln[1]:
      Hugh gave the boy apples or other small apposites [] , but the child was too interested in the bishop to notice the gifts.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apposite
  2. ^ http://media.merriam-webster.com/soundc11/a/apposi01

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

apposite f pl

  1. feminine plural of apposito

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

apposite

  1. vocative masculine singular of appositus