aura

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See also: Aura

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aura (a breeze, a breath of air, the air), from Ancient Greek αὔρα (aúra, breeze, soft wind), from ἀήρ (aḗr, air).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aura (plural aurae or auræ or auras)

  1. Distinctive atmosphere or quality associated with something.
  2. (parapsychology) An invisible force surrounding a living creature.
  3. (medicine) Perceptual disturbance experienced by some migraine sufferers before a migraine headache.
  4. (medicine) Telltale sensation experienced by some people with epilepsy before a seizure.

Synonyms[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural aures)

  1. aura

Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hōra.

Noun[edit]

aura f

  1. hour

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural aura's, diminutive auraatje n)

  1. aura

Finnish[edit]

(index au)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *atra, compare Estonian ader. Borrowed from a Germanic language (compare Old Norse arðr), from Proto-Germanic *arþrą, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂érh₃trom.

Noun[edit]

aura

  1. plough
  2. wedge (group of birds flying in a V-shaped formation)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura

  1. aura
Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural auras)

  1. aura

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

aura

  1. Third-person singular future indicative of avoir

External links[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aura (breeze, smell).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɒurɒ/
  • Hyphenation: au‧ra

Noun[edit]

aura (plural aurák)

  1. aura

Declension[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural aure)

  1. aura
  2. light breeze

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Ancient Greek αὔρα (aúra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aura f (genitive aurae); first declension

  1. the air
  2. a breeze
    dum flavit velis aura secunda meis. Ovidius. P. 2, 3, 26
    while a favorable breeze breathed on my sails, i. e. so long as I was in prosperity.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative aura aurae
genitive aurae aurārum
dative aurae aurīs
accusative auram aurās
ablative aurā aurīs
vocative aura aurae

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • aura in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural auras)

  1. aura (an invisible force surrounding a living creature)

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) ora

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura f

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) weather

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aura.

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural auras)

  1. aura

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

aura f (plural auras)

  1. The turkey vulture and related species in the genus Cathartes, carrion-eating birds native to the Americas.