better late than never

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps a calque of the Latin phrase potiusque sero quam nunquam from the 4th book[1] of Ab Urbe condita (History of Rome) by Titus Livius, around 27 BC.

Adverb[edit]

better late than never

  1. It's better to do something late, than to never do it at all.
    • 1996. Titus Livius (translation). Livy's History of Rome (in English):
      Their insolence and recklessness must be opposed, and better late than never.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butterfield, Bruce J. (1996), "Livy's History of Rome" (in English.), (HTML) Marquette University (mu.edu). URL accessed on May 29, 2007.