blat

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See also: Blat and blåt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Imitative. First attested in 1846.

Verb[edit]

blat (third-person singular simple present blats, present participle blatting, simple past and past participle blatted)

  1. To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat.
  2. To make a senseless noise.
  3. To talk inconsiderately.
  4. To produce an overrich or overblown sound on a brass instrument such as a trumpet, trombone, or tuba.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Russian блат (blat), from Polish blat (cover, umbrella) or Yiddish בלאַט (blat, leaf, list)

Noun[edit]

blat (uncountable)

  1. Connections; relationships; one's social or business network (in Russian or Soviet society).
    To open a new business in Russia you need blat.
Translations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin blādum, from Frankish *blād (field produce), from Proto-Germanic *blēdaz, *blēdō (flower, leaf), from Proto-Indo-European *bhlēdh-, *bhlōw-, *bhol- (to flower; leaf). Compare French blé.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blat m (uncountable)

  1. wheat

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bladą, whence also Old Saxon blad, Old English blæd, Old Norse blað. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlh̥₃oto, from *bʰleh₃-.

Noun[edit]

blat n (plural bletir)

  1. leaf

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Blatt.

Noun[edit]

blat

  1. the flat surface of a table