brocard

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From French brocard, cognate with Medieval Latin brocarda, brocardicorum opus, a collection of canonical laws written by the bishop Burchard of Worms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brocard (plural brocards)

  1. (law) A legal principle usually expressed in Latin, traditionally used to concisely express a wider legal concept or rule.
    • 1860, The Journal of Jurisprudence, Edinburgh, vol. IV, p. 414:
      The other question was as to the proper legal meaning of the brocard, “heres heredis mei est heres meus.
    • 1853, Samuel Owen, The New York Legal Observer, vol. XI, pp. 73-4:
      Blackstone, with a like tenderness of conscience, endeavors to withdraw a single case, a sale of provisions, from the old brocard caveat emptor, and tells us that in such a contract there is a warranty that the provisions are wholesome.

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

brocard m (plural brocards)

  1. mockery, ridicule

Derived terms[edit]