brogue

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English[edit]

A pair of brogues

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Irish bróg (boot, shoe). The "accent" sense may instead be derived from Old Irish barrog (a hold (on the tongue)).

Noun[edit]

brogue (plural brogues)

  1. A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
    • 1978, Louis L'Amour, Fair Blows the Wind, Bantam Books, page 62:
      I had no doubt he knew where I was from, for I had the brogue, although not much of it.
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest, Random House, page 187:
      “No-man's-land.” The words were spoken in a deep voice filled with salt water and brogue.
  2. A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
  3. (dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
  2. (intransitive) To walk.
  3. (transitive) To kick.
  4. (transitive) To punch a hole in, as with an awl.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from French brouiller

Verb[edit]

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (dialect) to fish for eels by disturbing the waters