bysen

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bysen, partly from Old English bȳsen (example, pattern, model, similitude, parable, parallel, rule, command, precept), and partly from Old Norse býsn (a wonder, a portentous thing), both from Proto-Germanic *būsniz (command, precept), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną (to ask, beg), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (to be awake, perceive fully). Cognate with Gothic 𐌱𐌿𐍃𐌽𐍃 (busns, command, order). See also forbisen, forbise.

Noun[edit]

bysen (plural bysens)

  1. (US, UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) An example; pattern.
  2. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Something monstrous or portentous; a shocking sight; sorry spectacle; disgraceful thing.
    a shame and a bysen
  3. (UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) A person presenting a ludicrous or disgusting spectacle.

Usage notes[edit]

In the U.S., the only acceptable spelling is "bisen."

Adjective[edit]

bysen (comparative more bysen, superlative most bysen)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Monstrous; shocking; conspicuously bad or disgraceful.

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *būsniz (command, precept), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną (to ask, beg), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (to be awake, perceive fully). Cognate with Old Saxon ambusan (command, precept), Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐌰𐌱𐌿𐍃𐌽𐍃 (anabusns, a command), Old Norse býsn (wonder, premonition).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbyːsen/, [ˈbyːzen]

Noun[edit]

bȳsen ?

  1. example, byspel
  2. pattern, model, exemplar; illustration
  3. parable; precept, command

Declension[edit]


Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]