calcar

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See also: calçar

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Italian calcara (lime-kiln).

Noun[edit]

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. A small oven or furnace, used for the calcination of sand and potash, and converting them into frit.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Latin calcar (spur).

Noun[edit]

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. (botany, anatomy) A spur-like projection.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre.

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular indicative present calco, past participle calcáu)

  1. to press, push
  2. to hit, strike

Conjugation[edit]


Latin[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

calcar n (genitive calcāris); third declension

  1. spur (equestrian, or of a cock)
  2. (figuratively) incitement, stimulus

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter "pure" i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative calcar calcāria
genitive calcāris calcārium
dative calcārī calcāribus
accusative calcar calcāria
ablative calcārī calcāribus
vocative calcar calcāria

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • New Latin Grammar, Allen and Greenough, 1903.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular present indicative calco, past participle calcado)

  1. to trample
  2. to press (grapes etc)
  3. to crush
  4. to humiliate

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

Verb[edit]

calcar (first-person singular present calco, first-person singular preterite calqué, past participle calcado)

  1. to trace, copy (copy by means of carbon paper or tracing paper)
  2. to trample

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]