cha

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See also: chā, chá, chǎ, chà, and -cha

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi चा / Urdu چا (), from Persian چا, from Sinitic .

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha (uncountable)

  1. The drink made by infusing the dried leaves or buds of the tea plant in hot water, often served with milk or cream and sugar added.
    Would you like a cup of cha?

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha (Triggers lenition of b, c, f, g, m, p, s. Triggers eclipsis of d, t.)

  1. (Ulster) not
    Cha phósann sí é. ― She will not marry him.
    Cha dtugaim. ― I do not give, I will not give.

Usage notes[edit]

Used only in some varieties of Ulster Irish. Not used with the future tense; a future meaning can be conveyed by using it with the present tense.

Related terms[edit]

  • chan (used before vowel sounds)
  • char (used before the past tense)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (used in Munster Irish, Connacht Irish, and some varieties of Ulster Irish)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. rōmaji reading of ちゃ
  2. rōmaji reading of チャ

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cha

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chā.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chá.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǎ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chà.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. not
    Cha bee'n poosey ayn. ― The marriage will not take place.
    Cha vel blass er. ― It has no taste.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cha

  1. Alternative form of cho.

Navajo[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. crying

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from con.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. not
    Cha robh bean aig Iain. ― Iain didn't have a wife.
    Cha toigh leam caise. ― I don't like cheese.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ki- + -a

Particle[edit]

cha

  1. of (class 7 nouns)

Usage notes[edit]

  1. The particle follows class 7 nouns to form a genitival relation of a noun that follows it, often corresponding to of or 's:
    kitabu cha mtoto ― child's book
    kiini cha yai ― egg yolk (lit. center of egg)

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /ṯɕaː˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /ṯɕaː˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /c̻aː˧˥/

Noun[edit]

cha

  1. father, dad

See also[edit]