cinch

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Occitan cencha or Spanish cincha (a belt or girth), from Latin cingula.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Particularly: "UK"

Noun[edit]

cinch (plural cinches)

  1. A simple saddle girth used in Mexico.
    • He found Andy morosely replacing some broken strands in his cinch, and he went straight at the mooted question. — B. M. Bower, The Flying U's Last Stand
  2. (informal) Something that is very easy to do.
    No problem ... it's a cinch.
    • "We thought we had a cinch on getting out by way of this cord and so we followed that." — Major Archibald Lee Fletcher, Boy Scouts in the Coal Caverns
  3. (informal) A firm hold.
    • You've got the cinch on him. You could send him to quod, and I'd send him there as quick as lightning. I'd hang him, if I could, for what he done to Lil Sarnia. — Gilbert Parker, The World For Sale,

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cinch (third-person singular simple present cinches, present participle cinching, simple past and past participle cinched)

  1. To bring to certain conclusion.
  2. To tighten down.

Quotations[edit]

  • 1911, "I intend to cinch that government business." — Margaret Burnham, The Girl Aviators' Sky Cruise

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Ladin[edit]

Ladin cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : cinch
    Ordinal : cuint

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *cinque, from Latin quīnque.

Adjective[edit]

cinch

  1. five

Noun[edit]

cinch m (uncountable)

  1. five