cinn

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Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (nominative/dative plural): ceanna (Cois Fharraige)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cinn m

  1. genitive singular of ceann
  2. nominative plural of ceann
  3. dative plural of ceann

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cinn chinn gcinn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kinnuz (chin) (compare Old Frisian zin, Old Saxon, Old Dutch, and Old High German kinni, Old Norse kinn, Gothic 𐌺𐌹𐌽𐌽𐌿𐍃 (kinnus)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu-, *ǵénus (compare Latin gena, Ancient Greek γένυς (génus), Welsh gen, Tocharian A śanwem, Old Armenian ծնաւտ (cnawt), Lithuanian žandas, Persian چانه (čâne), Sanskrit हनु (hánu)).

Noun[edit]

ċinn n

  1. chin

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kunją (race, kind).

Noun[edit]

cinn n

  1. Alternative form of cynn

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb[edit]

cinn (past chinn, future cinnidh, verbal noun cinntinn, past participle cinnte)

  1. grow
  2. prosper

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

cinn m

  1. genitive singular of ceann
  2. nominative plural of ceann