coctile

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin coctilis (burned”, “built of burned bricks), from coquō (I cook”, “I roast or dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒktɪl/, /ˈkɒktaɪl/

Adjective[edit]

coctile (not comparable)

  1. Made by baking, or exposure to heat.
    • 1885, Samuel Fallows, The Progressive Dictionary of the English Language, page 130/3, “Coctive”:
      Coctive…Made by baking or exposing to heat, as a brick; coctile.
    1. of earthenware
      • 1705, Willem Bosman (author; translator unknown), A New and Accurate Deſcription of the Coaſt of Guinea, letter XXI, page 437:
        Theſe Corals…are made of a ſort of pale red Coctile Earth or Stone.
      • 1851, “The Age of Honesty”, article VIII in The Dublin Review XXXI, № lxii, page 599:
        The excavations continued, and soon a most singularly shaped coctile vessel, or terra cotta urn…was brought to light.
      • 1874, J.D. Beglar and A.C.L. Carlleyle, Delhi, page 189:
        Now, these tiles are of the coctile kind, or which have been baked red like bricks or common red “roofing tiles.”
      • 1995, Paolo Favole, Squares in Contemporary Architecture, page 71:
        An oval platform of stone…stands out inside a perimeter frame of beige coctile brick with a fishbone formation.
    2. of bread
      • 1887, Wallace’s Monthly XIII, page 365:
        Was ever coctile product more appetizing to hungry mortals! The good Dr. Talmage…acknowledges a heavy debt to good bread as a stimulant to an overdrained brain.
  2. Built of baked bricks.
    • 1842, Tait’s Edinburgh Magazine IX, page 682:
      From the tiles and skylights of a coctile edifice.
    • 1850, David Urquhart, The Pillars of Hercules II, book iv, chapter 2, page 145:
      Beyond this region spread dead levels, which…resembled the sea. From the city’s lofty walls stretched on all sides…flatness and luxuriance. What, then, could taste divine and power accomplish…to transport thither a primeval forest, and to pile up coctile mountains to place it on. Such was the design of the Hanging Gardens.
    • 1996, Douglas D. Burleigh and Jane W.M. Spicer, Proceedings of the Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers MMDCCLXVI: Thermosense XVIII, page 58:
      The “coctile” texture of the wall is visible where there are lacks of plaster and elements of stone appear too.

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Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coctile

  1. nominative neuter singular of coctilis
  2. accusative neuter singular of coctilis
  3. vocative neuter singular of coctilis