code

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See also: Code and codé

English[edit]

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old French code (system of law), from Latin codex, later form of caudex (the stock or stem of a tree, a board or tablet of wood smeared over with wax, on which the ancients originally wrote; hence, a book, a writing.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

code (plural codes)

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  1. A short symbol, often with little relation to the item it represents.
    This flavour of soup has been assigned the code WRT-9.
  2. A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest.
    "The collection of laws made by the order of Justinian is sometimes called, by way of eminence, "The Code"." -Wharton
  3. Any system of principles, rules or regulations relating to one subject; as, the medical code, a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians; the naval code, a system of rules for making communications at sea means of signals.
  4. A set of rules for converting information into another form or representation.
    1. By synecdoche: a code word, code point, an encoded representation of a character, symbol, or other entity.
      The ASCII code of "A" is 65.
  5. (cryptography) A cryptographic system using a codebook that converts words or phrases into codewords.
  6. (programming, uncountable) Instructions for a computer, written in a programming language; the input of a translator, an interpreter or a browser, namely: source code, machine code, bytecode.
    Object-oriented C++ code is easier to understand for a human than C code.
    I wrote some code to reformat text documents.
    1. By synecdoche: any piece of a program, of a document or something else written in a computer language.
      This HTML code may be placed on your web page.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

code (third-person singular simple present codes, present participle coding, simple past and past participle coded)

  1. (computing) To write software programs.
    I learned to code on an early home computer in the 1980s.
  2. To categorise by assigning identifiers from a schedule, for example CPT coding for medical insurance purposes.
  3. (cryptography) To encode.
    We should code the messages we sent out on Usenet.
  4. (medicine) Of a patient, to suffer a sudden medical emergency such as cardiac arrest.
  5. (genetics, intransitive) To encode a protein.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

code c (plural codes, diminutive codetje n)

  1. code

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

code m (plural codes)

  1. code

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin coda, from Latin cauda.

Noun[edit]

code f (plural codis)

  1. tail
  2. queue, line

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

code f

  1. plural form of coda

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cubitus

Noun[edit]

code m (oblique plural codes, nominative singular codes, nominative plural code)

  1. elbow

Descendants[edit]


Tarantino[edit]

Noun[edit]

code

  1. tail