col

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From French col, from Latin collum (neck).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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col (plural cols)

  1. A dip between mountain peaks in a summit-line.

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition con (with) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction[edit]

col m (feminine cola, neuter colo, masculine plural colos, feminine plural coles)

  1. with the

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *cu illu < Latin eccum illum. Compare Italian quello, Romanian acel, Old French cil, Spanish aquel.

Pronoun[edit]

col

  1. that

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French col (collar), from Latin collum (neck).

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (clothing) collar

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (plural collen, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (sports) mountain pass

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French colle

Noun[edit]

col f (uncountable)

  1. (informal, Belgium) glue

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin collum (neck).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols)

  1. collar
  2. col
  3. neck (now especially of objects, vases etc.)

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Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

col f (plural coles)

  1. wild mustard, wild cabbage; Brassica oleracea

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Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (genitive coil, nominative plural colanna)

  1. prohibition
  2. sin, lust
  3. violation
  4. dislike
  5. incest
  6. relation, relationship

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
col chol gcol
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Contraction[edit]

col

  1. contraction of con il; with the

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

col

  1. rafsi of co.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin collum

Noun[edit]

col m (plural cols)

  1. (anatomy) the neck

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kōluz. Cognate with Old High German kuoli.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cōl (comparative cōlra, superlative cōlost)

  1. cool (not hot or warm)
Declension[edit]
Weak Strong
singular plural singular plural
m n f m n f m n f
nominative cōla cōle cōle cōlan nom. cōl cōle cōl cōla, -e
accusative cōlan cōle cōlan acc. cōlne cōl cōle cōle cōl cōla, -e
genitive cōlan cōlra, cōlena gen. cōles cōles cōlre cōlra
dative cōlan cōlum dat. cōlum cōlum cōlre cōlum
instrumental cōle


Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *kulą. Cognate with Old High German kolo, Old Norse kol.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col n

  1. coal
Declension[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin collum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (oblique plural cous or cox or cols, nominative singular cous or cox or cols, nominative plural col)

  1. (anatomy) neck

Descendants[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

col m (genitive cola, plural colan)

  1. incest

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Zoll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cȏl m (Cyrillic spelling цо̑л)

  1. inch

Declension[edit]

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin caulis (stalk, stem), from Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem of a plant).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

col f (plural coles)

  1. cabbage

Synonyms[edit]

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