compadre

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Spanish compadre ("joint father, godfather, friend").

Noun[edit]

compadre (plural compadres)

  1. A friend or companion.
    • 1839, J. P. and W. P. Robertson, Letters from Paraguay, comprising an account of four years residence in that republic, under the dictator Francia. John Murray (London), p. 339.
      Whenever he had a compadre or a friend, it was his bounden duty to do him some service.

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese compadre, conpadre, from Latin compater, from cum + pater.

Cognate with Galician compadre, Spanish compadre, Catalan compare and Italian compare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

compadre m (plural compadres, feminine comadre, feminine plural comadres)

  1. Godfather of one's child.
  2. Parent of one's godchild.
  3. friend

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin compater, from con- + pater (father).

Noun[edit]

compadre m (plural compadres)

  1. Godfather of one's child.
  2. Parent of one's godchild.
  3. friend
  4. (colloquial) father of one's child's spouse.
  5. (Mexico) binge or partying habitual companion.
  6. (Argentina) person of the generation whose parents fought in Argentina's war of independence from Spain.[1]
  7. (Nicaragua, colloquial) The relation between a man and his wife's lover, or in the case of divorce, the relation between the previous and current husband. In general, the relation between two men who have been involved with the same woman.

Antonyms[edit]

  • (godfather): comadre (feminine form)
  • (godchild's father): comadre (feminine form)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tango Vancouver.com Tango dance history, Argentina's Gauchos, Compadres and Compadritos

Usage notes[edit]

  • In Spanish, compadre and padrino are not synonyms