con

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Contents

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English connen, from Old English cunnan (to know, know how). More at can.

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (rare) To study, especially in order to gain knowledge of.
    • Wordsworth
      Fixedly did look / Upon the muddy waters which he conned / As if he had been reading in a book.
    • Burke
      I did not come into Parliament to con my lesson.
    • 1963, D'Arcy Niland, Dadda jumped over two elephants: short stories:
      The hawk rested on a crag of the gorge and conned the terrain with a fierce and frowning eye.
  2. (rare, archaic) To know, understand, acknowledge.
  3. Variant spelling of conn: to conduct the movements of a ship at sea.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of Latin contra (against).

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. A disadvantage of something, especially when contrasted with its advantages (pros).
    pros and cons
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from convict.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (slang) A convicted criminal, a convict.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From con trick, shortened from confidence trick.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. (slang) A fraud; something carried out with the intention of deceiving, usually for personal, often illegal, gain.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (transitive, slang) To trick or defraud, usually for personal gain.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From earlier cond, from Middle English conduen, from Old French conduire, from Latin condūcere, present active infinitive of condūcō (draw together; conduct).

Verb[edit]

con (third-person singular simple present cons, present participle conning, simple past and past participle conned)

  1. (nautical) To give the necessary orders to the helmsman to steer a ship in the required direction through a channel etc. (rather than steer a compass direction)
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

con (uncountable)

  1. (nautical) The navigational direction of a ship
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Clipping of convention or conference.

Noun[edit]

con (plural cons)

  1. An organized gathering such as a convention or conference.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conus.

Noun[edit]

con m (plural cons)

  1. cone

Related terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cunnus.

Noun[edit]

con m

  1. (vulgar) vulva, cunt

Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese con, from Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 2: Númerus:
      Cumu to é custión de proporciós, sin que sirva de argumentu por nun fel falta, poemus vel que en a misma Europa hai Estaus Soberarius con menus territoriu que os tres lugaris nossus, cumu:
      As everything is a matter of proportions, without its presence being an argument, we can see that even in Europe there are Sovereign States with less territory than our three places, such as:

Antonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cunnus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m (plural cons)

  1. (taboo slang) cunt
  2. (derogatory slang) A stupid person; arsehole (British)

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum, "with".

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con m

  1. genitive singular of

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
con chon gcon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum, ("with").

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with or together
  2. (rowing) coxed

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

con

  1. rafsi of condi.

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cunnus.

Noun[edit]

con m (oblique plural cons, nominative singular cons, nominative plural con)

  1. (vulgar) cunt (human female genitalia)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

see conme

Conjunction[edit]

con

  1. Alternative form of conme.

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱón.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum (with).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

con

  1. with
  2. on
    Yo cuento con ustedes.
    I count on you.

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

con

  1. child

Synonyms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

con

  1. you (addressed to a person younger than the speaker, especially a child)

Classifier[edit]

con

  1. Usually indicates animate noun.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Exceptions exist, such as con dao (knife).

Antonyms[edit]