confessio amantis

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin: cōnfessiō (confession) + amantis (“of loving”, the genitive singular of amāns, “loving”, the present active participle of amō, “I love”)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

confessio amantis (plural confessiones amantis or confessiones amantium, see the usage note)

  1. A lover’s confession.
    • 1835, Old Maids; Their Varieties, Characters, and Conditions, page 91
      We think we cannot do better than favour our gentle and ungentle readers with the two following letters — both from distinguished Accidental Old Maids — and addressed to two young maidens, who had no desire that any accident should intervene which might devote them to what they most erroneously denominated ‘joyless celibacy.’ — These letters are in themselves curious ‘confessiones amantium.’

Usage notes[edit]

  • If “a lover’s confessions” (that is, the multiple confessions of one lover) is the intended sense, use confessiones amantis; if “lovers’ confessions” (the multiple confessions of multiple lovers), use confessiones amantium.
  • This phrase occurs overwhelmingly more commonly as the title of John Gower’s Middle English epic poem of the same name.