constitute

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English[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology[edit]

From Latin constitutum, past participle of constituere. Constructed from the prefix con- and statuere (to place, set).

Verb[edit]

constitute (third-person singular simple present constitutes, present participle constituting, simple past and past participle constituted)

  1. To cause to stand; to establish; to enact.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      Laws appointed and constituted by lawful authority.
  2. To make up; to compose; to form.
    • Johnson
      Truth and reason constitute that intellectual gold that defies destruction.
  3. To appoint, depute, or elect to an office; to make and empower.
    • William Wordsworth
      Me didst Thou constitute a priest of thine.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

constitute (plural constitutes)

  1. (obsolete) An established law.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of T. Preston to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

constitūte

  1. vocative singular of constitūtus