corridor

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French corridor, from Italian corridore (= corridoio) long passage, from correre, to run.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒɹɪˌdɔː(ɹ)/, /ˈkɒrɪˌdə(ɹ)/
  • (GenAM) enPR: kôrʹədôr', IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹəˌdɔɹ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

corridor (plural corridors)

  1. A narrow hall or passage with rooms leading off it, for example in railway carriages (see Wikipedia).
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, Gossamer, Ch.I:
      There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. [] Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, Death Walks in Eastrepps, chapter 1/1:
      Eldridge closed the despatch-case with a snap and, rising briskly, walked down the corridor to his solitary table in the dining-car.
  2. A restricted tract of land that allows passage between two places.
  3. Airspace restricted for the passage of aircraft.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian corridore.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corridor m (plural corridors)

  1. passage, corridor

External links[edit]