dido

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See also: Dido and ɗiɗo

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin unknown. The "trick" sense might come from the trick of Dido, queen of Carthage, who, having bought as much land as a hide would cover, is said to have cut it into thin strips long enough to enclose a spot for a citadel.

Noun[edit]

dido (plural didoes)

  1. (slang, regional) A fuss, a row.
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 30:
      I remember Raymond telling me years later how when he lived at home, if his mother heard he had been seen as much as talking to a girl, she would kick up a dido.
  2. A shrewd trick; an antic; a caper.
    to cut a dido
    • 1838, Joseph Clay Neal, Charcoal Sketches; Or, Scenes in a Metropolis, p. 201
      Young people," interposed a passing official, " if you keep a cutting didoes, I must talk to you both like a Dutch uncle.

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dido (not comparable)

  1. (US) Misspelling of ditto.

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin digitus (finger).

Noun[edit]

dido

  1. finger

Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

dido (accusative singular didon, plural didoj, accusative plural didojn)

  1. dodo (bird)

Alternative forms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dis- + -do; see cre-do for details.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active dīdō, present infinitive dīdere, perfect active dīdidī, supine dīditum

  1. I give out, spread abroad, disseminate, distribute, scatter.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • dido in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879