ding

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See also: Ding, dīng, díng, dǐng, and dìng

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dingen, dyngen (strong verb), from Old English *dingan (to ding), from Proto-Germanic *dingwaną (to beat), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (to beat, push). Related to Old English dengan (to ding, beat, strike, weak verb) and Old Norse dengja (to hammer, weak verb); both from Proto-Germanic *dangijaną (to beat, hammer, peen), causative of *dingwaną. Cognate with Icelandic dengja (to hammer), Swedish dänga (to bang, beat), Danish dænge (to bang, beat), German tengeln, dengeln (to peen).

Noun[edit]

ding (plural dings)

  1. (informal) Very minor damage, a small dent or chip.
  2. (colloquial) A rejection.
    I just got my first ding letter.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ding (third-person singular simple present dings, present participle dinging, simple past dinged or dang (obsolete), past participle dinged or dung (obsolete))

  1. (transitive) To sound, as a bell; to ring; to clang.
    The elevator dinged and the doors opened.
  2. (transitive) To hit or strike.
  3. To dash; to throw violently.
    • Milton
      to ding the book a coit's distance from him
  4. (transitive) To inflict minor damage upon, especially by hitting or striking.
    If you surf regularly, then you're going to ding your board. — BBC surfing Wales [1]
  5. (transitive, colloquial) To fire or reject.
    His top school dinged him last week.
  6. (transitive, colloquial) To deduct, as points, from another, in the manner of a penalty.
    My bank dinged me three bucks for using their competitor's ATM.
  7. (transitive, golf) To mishit (a golf ball).
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic. Compare ding-dong,

Noun[edit]

ding (plural dings)

  1. A high-pitched sound of a bell, especially with wearisome continuance.

Verb[edit]

ding (third-person singular simple present dings, present participle dinging, simple past and past participle dinged)

  1. (intransitive) To make high-pitched sound like a bell.
    • Washington Irving
      The fretful tinkling of the convent bell evermore dinging among the mountain echoes.
  2. (transitive) To keep repeating; impress by reiteration, with reference to the monotonous striking of a bell.
    • 1884, Oswald Crawfurd, English comic dramatists:
      If I'm to have any good, let it come of itself; not keep dinging it, dinging it into one so.
  3. (intransitive, colloquial, gaming) To level up
See also[edit]
ding with an animal mask

Etymology 3[edit]

Romanized from Mandarin (dǐng)

Noun[edit]

ding (plural dings)

  1. Ancient Chinese vessel with legs and a lid; also called ting.

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch ding.

Noun[edit]

ding (plural dinge)

  1. thing

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch thing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą. Cognate with Low German Ding, German Ding, West Frisian ding, English thing, Old Norse þing, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish ting.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ding n (plural dingen, diminutive dingetje n)

  1. matter, thing

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

ding

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dingen
  2. imperative of dingen

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [dʲɪɲ], [dʲɪɲɟ]

Verb[edit]

ding (present analytic dingeann, future analytic dingfidh, verbal noun dingeadh, past participle dingthe)

  1. to wedge
  2. to make compact
  3. to dent

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ding dhing nding
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ding

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dīng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of díng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of dǐng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of dìng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Old Norse dengja (to beat, thrash). Cognate with Swedish dänga, Danish dænge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tae ding (third-person singular simple present dings, present participle dingin, simple past dang, past participle dung)

  1. to beat, hit, strike
  2. to beat, excel, defeat
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, II.3:
      ‘Gude help him!—twa lines o' Davie Lindsay would ding a' he ever clerkit.’