dis-

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French des-, from Latin dis-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. reversal or removal
    disassociate
    disarray
  2. apart
    disconnect
  3. Used as an intensifier of words with negative valence.
    disembowel
    disannul

Usage notes[edit]

When attached to a verbal root, prefixes often change the first vowel (whether initial or preceded by a consonant/consonant cluster) of that verb. These phonological changes took place in Latin and usually do not apply to words created (as in Modern Latin) from Latin components since Latin became a 'dead' language. Note: the combination of prefix and following vowel did not always yield the same change. (see examples below at con- + -a-) Also, these changes in vowels are not necessarily particular to being prefixed with dis- (i.e. other prefixes sometimes cause the same vowel change- see con-, ex-).

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

NOTE: Words using the prefix dis- do not necessarily use the prefixes given here when translated. See individual words for more accurate translations.

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. dis-

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwis.

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. shows separation, dissemination, e.g. semi (sow) > dissemi (disseminate) ; ŝiri (tear) > disŝiri (tear to pieces).

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dis-.

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. dis-

Derived terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dis-

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐌹𐍃-

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto dis-, from Latin dis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwis.

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. shows separation or dissemination

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. Alternative form of dios-.

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dis- dhis- ndis-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dis-.

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. dis-

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dwis. Cognates include Ancient Greek δίς (dís) and Sanskrit द्वीह् (dvíḥ).

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. asunder, apart, in two
    dīmittō — "dismiss, disband"
    discēdō — "part, separate"
  2. reversal, removal
    dissimulō — "disguise, conceal"
  3. utterly, exceedingly
    differtus — "stuffed full"

Usage notes[edit]

The spelling changes to di- before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, and v, and it changes to dif- before f. When prefixed to a word beginning with consonantal i, the spelling may be dis- or di-.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • dis- in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Spanish[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dis-

  1. dis-

Derived terms[edit]