doof

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From dufus

Noun[edit]

doof (plural doofs)

  1. (US, slang) A simpleton.

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic, from the sound of a bass drum.

Noun[edit]

doof (plural doofs)

  1. (Australia, slang) A type of music with pronounced bass typically associated with the modified car scene; doof-doof.
  2. (Australia) An outdoor dance party, held in bushland in a remote area or on the outskirts of a city.
    • 2004, Graham St John (editor), Rave Culture and Religion, page 138,
      Dynamics of play and creativity are a prominent catalyst of social relations at both doofs and raves.
    • 2006, Christopher Hugh Partridge, The Re-Enchantment of the West: Alternative Spiritualities, Sacralization, Popular Culture and Occulture, Volume 2, page 110,
      Similar themes emerged in the ‘doofs’ of Australian rave culture.
    • 2007, Australian National University Dept of Pacific and Southeast Asian History, Aboriginal History, Volume 31, page 76,
      The bush doof is a unique product of post-rave culture and is particularly suited to the expansive Australian landscape.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *dōf, from Proto-Germanic *daubaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

doof (comparative dover, superlative doofst)

  1. Deaf.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

doof

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doven
  2. imperative of doven

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German doof (deaf), from Middle Low German dōf. Cognate to High German taub.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Inflected forms: IPA(key): /doːv-/ (predominantly)
  • Inflected forms: IPA(key): /doːf-/ (some speakers in southern Germany and Austria)

Adjective[edit]

doof (comparative doofer or dööfer, superlative am doofsten or dööfsten)

  1. stupid, dumb.
  2. (dialectal) boring

Usage notes[edit]

  • Low German regularly changes its final obstruent f to v (IPA: [v]) when a vowel follows: en doof Mann → enen doven Mann. This sound-change is usually kept in standard German pronunciation, although the forms are always spelt with f. (For more words in which written f may be pronounced [v] compare Elfer, Fünfer, and schief.)
  • The comparation forms with umlaut (döfer, am döfsten) are restricted to colloquial usage.

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • doof in Duden online

Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with English deaf. The second meaning stems from the old misconception that dumb or deaf people were mentally disabled. German doof is taken from this word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

doof (comparative döver, superlative döövst)

  1. deaf
  2. dumb (not clever)

Declension[edit]