douit

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Guernésiais douit, from Anglo-Norman duit, from Old French duit, from Latin ductum.

Noun[edit]

douit (plural douits)

  1. (Guernsey) A stream or brook.
    • 1965, John Christopher, A Wrinkle in the Skin:
      He crossed the douit and forced his way into the thicket.
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 129:
      He said, ‘Didn't you know that every douit and every hedge and every inch and square inch of land on Guernsey is weighed and measured, and has been for centuries?’
    • 1989, Stephen Birnbaum, Birnbaum's Great Britain 1990:
      Visitors can stroll down to the beach along wooded paths beside streams known as "douits."
    • 2011, ‘Blondel turns on the style’, The Guernsey Press, 20 May 2011:
      The pair were virtually inseparable over the front nine until Eggo’s second shot on the ninth dived into the douit short of the green not to be seen again.

Guernésiais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman duit, from Old French duit, from Latin ductum. Compare Jèrriais douët.

Noun[edit]

douit m (plural douits)

  1. water-course, stream; drinking trough