dub

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban (to knight by striking with a sword) perhaps borrowed from Old French aduber, adober "equip with arms; adorn" (also 11th century, Modern French adouber), of uncertain origin, but possibly from a Frankish *dubban, cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

The modern sense of "to name" is from the 1590s.

Verb[edit]

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with the sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call.
    • 1907, Robert Chambers, chapter 5, The Younger Set[1]:
      As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70: 
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
  3. (transitive) To deem.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
    • Morte d'Arthure
      His diadem was dropped down / Dubbed with stones.
  5. To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
      to dub a stick of timber smooth
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlinson to this entry?)
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From a shortening of the word double.

Verb[edit]

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  2. To copy the audio track onto a film.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dub (uncountable)

  1. (music) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music) A growing trend of music from 2009 to current in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
  4. (slang) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
    • 2001, Nancy Macdonald, The Graffiti Subculture (page 84)
      [] we climbed up the scaffolding and did these gold little dubs and you couldn't see them.
    • 2011, Justin Rollins, The Lost Boyz: A Dark Side of Graffiti (page 34)
      The year 1998 was alive with graffiti and trains pulling up with dubs on their sides.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare Irish dobhar (water), Welsh dŵr (water).

Noun[edit]

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (UK, dialect) A pool or puddle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Etymology 4[edit]

From shortening of double dime (twenty).

Noun[edit]

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)

Verb[edit]

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Now the drum dubs.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dub m, inanimate

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • dub in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • dub in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dub

  1. rafsi of du.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ.

Noun[edit]

dub m

  1. oak

Declension[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *dubus (black), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (black).

Adjective[edit]

dub (u-stem)

  1. black
  2. morally dark, dire, gloomy, melancholy

Noun[edit]

dub m (u-stem, genitive duib)

  1. black pigment, ink
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, Wb. 15a10
      dub" glosses atramento
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 13d1
      in maith a n-dubso amne
      is this ink good thus?
  2. gall

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [2]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰanw-.

Noun[edit]

dub m (Cyrillic spelling дуб)

  1. (Croatia, archaic) oak (wood)
  2. (Croatia, archaic) oak tree

Synonyms[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ

Noun[edit]

dub m (genitive singular duba, nominative plural duby), declension pattern dub

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Preposition[edit]

dub

  1. by