dur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: DUR, dúr, dûr, and dùr

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German, from Latin durus (hard, firm, vigorous).

Adjective[edit]

dur (not comparable)

  1. (music, obsolete) major; in the major mode
    C dur

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin dūrus.

Adjective[edit]

dur m (feminine dura, masculine plural durs, feminine plural dures)

  1. hard
  2. difficult
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin dūcere, present active infinitive of dūcō.

Verb[edit]

dur (first-person singular present duc, past participle dut)

  1. to carry
  2. to bring
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dūrus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dur m (feminine dure, masculine plural durs, feminine plural dures) dur

  1. hard, tough (difficult to penetrate)
  2. hard (not soft)
  3. hard, tough (not easy, difficult)
  4. harsh (e.g. harsh conditions)
  5. (art) harsh (of a penstroke)

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

dur

  1. hard
    travailler dur - to work hard.

Noun[edit]

dur m (plural durs)

  1. firmness, solidity

dur m (plural durs, feminine dure)

  1. hard case (tough person)

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dur

  1. rafsi of dunra.

Romani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Hindi दूर (dūr).

Adverb[edit]

dur

  1. far

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dūrus.

Adjective[edit]

dur 4 nom/acc forms

  1. hard, tough
  2. rough, harsh, severe

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dur c

  1. (music) major scale

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dur

  1. stop (imperative)