ed

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

ed (countable and uncountable, plural eds)

  1. edition
  2. editor
  3. education (uncountable)

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

ed

  1. Education. Often used in set phrases such as phys ed, driver's ed, special ed, etc.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin haedus. Compare Daco-Romanian ied.

Noun[edit]

ed

  1. kid (goat)

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Noun[edit]

ed c (singular definite eden, plural indefinite eder)

  1. oath (solemn pledge)

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

ed m (plural eds)

  1. eth

Anagrams[edit]


Ido[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony instead of e)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony, instead of e)
    1. Parlo italiano ed inglese.

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Noun[edit]

ed m

  1. oath

Declension[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *id.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ed n

  1. it
    • circa 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 17c7
      Is ed as·berat ind heretic.
      It is what the heretics say.

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ed c

  1. oath

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English head.

Noun[edit]

ed

  1. head

Volapük[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel)

See also[edit]