ed

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

ed (countable and uncountable, plural eds)

  1. edition
  2. editor
  3. education (uncountable)

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

ed

  1. Education. Often used in set phrases such as phys ed, driver's ed, special ed, etc.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin haedus. Compare Daco-Romanian ied.

Noun[edit]

ed

  1. kid (goat)

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Noun[edit]

ed c (singular definite eden, plural indefinite eder)

  1. oath (solemn pledge)

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

ed m (plural eds)

  1. eth

Anagrams[edit]


Ido[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony instead of e)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin et

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony, instead of e)
    1. Parlo italiano ed inglese. - I speak Italian and English.

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Noun[edit]

ed m

  1. oath

Declension[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *id.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ed n

  1. it
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 17c7
      Is ed as·berat ind heretic.
      It is what the heretics say.

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ed c

  1. oath

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English head.

Noun[edit]

ed

  1. head

Volapük[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel)

See also[edit]