eke

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See also: Eke and éke

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English eken (to increase), from Old English īecan (to increase), from West Germanic aukjana, from Proto-Germanic *aukaną (increase), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg- (to increase). Akin to Danish øge, Icelandic auka, Swedish öka and Latin augeō, Old English ēac (also).

Verb[edit]

eke (third-person singular simple present ekes, present participle eking, simple past and past participle eked)

  1. (obsolete except in eke out) To increase; to add to, augment, lengthen.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Canto I.v
      Here endlesse penance for one fault I pay, / But that redoubled crime with vengeance new / Thou biddest me to eeke?
    • 2012 July 11, Ben Perry, “Branson's spaceship steals the spotlight at airshow”, Yahoo News, accessed on 2012-07-12:
      British tycoon Richard Branson stole the show here Wednesday, announcing that he and his family would be on Virgin Galactic's first trip into space, as Airbus and Boeing eked out more plane orders.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekes)

  1. (obsolete) An addition.
    • Geddes
      Clumsy ekes that may well be spared.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English eke, eake (an addition), from Old English ēaca (an addition). Akin to Old Norse auki (an addition).

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekes)

  1. (beekeeping, archaic) A very small addition to the bottom of a beehive, often merely of a few bands of straw, on which the hive is raised temporarily.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English eek (also), from Old English ēac, ēc (also), from Proto-Germanic *auk. Akin to West Frisian ek, Dutch ook (also), German auch (also), Swedish ock (also).

Adverb[edit]

eke (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Also.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 1
      'Tis false: for Arthur wore in hall / Round-table like a farthingal, / On which, with shirt pull'd out behind, / And eke before, his good knights dined.
    • 1782, The Diverting History of John Gilpin, by William Cowper
      'John Gilpin was a citizen / of credit and renown / A train-band captain eke was he / of famous London town.'
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Turkic language, compare the Turkish verb form ek.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛkɛ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eke

Noun[edit]

eke (plural ekék)

  1. plough (Commonwealth), plow (USA)

Declension[edit]


Maori[edit]

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Verb[edit]

eke

  1. to embark

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish, from ek (oak).

Noun[edit]

eke n

  1. (uncountable) wood of oak

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

eke

  1. dative singular of ek

Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eke

  1. dative singular of ek