elenchus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἔλεγχος (élenkhos, refutation, scrutiny).

Noun[edit]

elenchus (uncountable)

  1. (rhetoric) A technique of argument associated with Socrates wherein the arguer asks the interlocutor to agree with a series of premises and conclusions, ending with the arguer's intended point.
    • 1991, Thomas c. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, “Socrates’ Elenctic Mission”, in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume IX (1991),[1] Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-823990-1, page 131–132:
      The elenchus begins when an interlocutor makes some moral claim that Socrates wishes to examine. The argument then proceeds from premisses that express certain of the interlocutor’s other beliefs to a conclusion that contradicts the original moral claim under scrutiny.

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elenchus m (genitive elenchī); second declension

  1. costly trinket (especially an earring)
  2. refutation

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative elenchus elenchī
genitive elenchī elenchōrum
dative elenchō elenchīs
accusative elenchum elenchōs
ablative elenchō elenchīs
vocative elenche elenchī