enjoin

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French enjoindre (to join with), from Latin iniungo (to attach), a compound of in- (into” “upon) and iungo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

enjoin (third-person singular simple present enjoins, present participle enjoining, simple past and past participle enjoined)

  1. (transitive, chiefly literary) To lay upon, as an order or command; to give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order; to charge.
    • King James Bible - Esther 9:31
      To confirm these days of Purim in their times appointed, according as Mordecai the Jew and Esther the queen had enjoined them []
    • Shakespeare
      I am enjoined by oath to observe three things.
  2. (transitive, law) To prohibit or restrain by a judicial order or decree; to put an injunction on.
    • Kent
      This is a suit to enjoin the defendants from disturbing the plaintiffs.

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