erudite

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ērudītus, participle of ērudiō (educate, train), from e- (out of) + rudis (rude, unskilled).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

erudite (comparative more erudite, superlative most erudite)

  1. Learned, scholarly, with emphasis on knowledge gained from books.
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Ch. XII:
      At all events, if it involved any secret information in regard to old Roger Chillingworth, it was in a tongue unknown to the erudite clergyman, and did but increase the bewilderment of his mind.
    • 1913, Edith Wharton, The Custom of the Country, ch. 43:
      Elmer Moffatt had been magnificent, rolling out his alternating effects of humour and pathos, stirring his audience by moving references to the Blue and the Gray, convulsing them by a new version of Washington and the Cherry Tree . . ., dazzling them by his erudite allusions and apt quotations.
    • 2006, Jeff Israely, "Preaching Controversy," Time, 17 Sept.:
      Perhaps his erudite mind does not quite yet grasp how to transform his beloved scholarly explorations into effective papal politics.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

erudite

  1. feminine plural of erudito

Noun[edit]

erudite f

  1. plural form of erudita

Verb[edit]

erudite

  1. second-person plural present indicative of erudire
  2. second-person plural imperative of erudire
  3. feminine plural of erudito

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ērudītus (educated, accomplished)

Adverb[edit]

ērudītē (comparative ērudītius, superlative ērudītissimē)

  1. learnedly, with erudition

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)