fader

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Fader, fäder, and fāder

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fade +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. A device used to control sound volume.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative form of fade: more fade

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Noun[edit]

fader c (singular definite faderen, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. father
  2. A term of address for a Christian priest.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

fader

  1. (reflexive, informal) to get stuck with

Conjugation[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative form of fade

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. father

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

p. 1, Arthur; A Short Sketch of his Life and History in English Verse of the First Half of the Fifteenth Century, Frederick Furnivall ed. EETS. Trübner & Co.: London. 1864.


Old Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Compare Old Saxon fadar, Old Frisian feder, Old English fæder, Old High German fater, Old Norse faðir, Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌳𐌰𐍂 (fadar).

Noun[edit]

fader m

  1. father

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fæder. Compare faither.

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. father

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish faþir, from Old Norse faðir/ᚠᛆᚦᛁᛧ, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Masculine in Late Modern Swedish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader c

  1. (archaic) a father
  2. a term of address for a Christian priest

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]